Night heats dont help trying to sleep

If i do get to sleep, the first time i wake, i feel my body heat up all through, especially in my back or front whatever is bed-side down, so i am constantly moving about. Goodness knows how hubby sleeps with my fidgeting…I sleep best when he holds me – i think my body instantly accepts the safety & comfort of it, but when i wake we are apart. So i do get a little sleep if we start like spoons.. but these ruddy night sweats do my head in….

If i get 4 solid hours of sleep i am amazed its normally broken sleep 1st wake around 2ish, then drifting in and out, waking around 4ish & then 5ish as hubby alarm at 5.30 then drift again till i get up around 7.15. That's when i want TO ACTUALLY SLEEP...& can't!

Posted 17 Nov 2011 at 8:28 PM
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  • Sleepio Member

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    Hi Nocturne, Poor you what a horrid experience with the consultant! As you say there are not to many like him around now thank goodness but its no help to you.
    Its interesting as my temperature fluctates wildly too. However I tend to always be cold during the day then I get into bed and overheat terribly. I came off HRT at Christmas and there's no doubt it helped control the night sweats. The stupid thing is I can go to bed in the middle of summer with freezing feet and I have to wear bed socks to warm up, 10mins later I'm boiling! It definitely affects your sleep but I know its excarberated by drinking too late in the evening and stress. I don't know what the answer is and it can make you feel very low sometimes. However doing the course has helped me a lot because if I don't sleep I don't worry about it so much any more which makes a huge difference to how I feel.
    Good luck with trying to get some help, but know that we all there to try and help too.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Dear nocturne,
    What a horrible experience you had and thankfully, as Sheila said, these baboons are few on the ground although I've come across a few too.
    I am curious to know why it took years to get a referral. Surely doctors have a duty of care. Perhaps you're one of those ones who doesn't make a fuss and relies on the doctor to make the decisions.
    I have been told (reliable source) that nowadays, it's up to the patient to TELL the doctor what he/she wants and I remember not so long ago being quite shocked when my GP asked me, “what do you want me to do?” I'm no medic and felt out of my depth. I think my answer now would be, “investigate and fix it”.
    As far as I'm aware, you are entitled to a second opinion (and a more appropriate Consultant).
    Google the private hospitals in your area…see who has the expertise you are looking for…..request to be seen by them on the NHS. This is only a suggestion and others on here may have a better idea.
    Good luck…glad you got it “off your chest”. It's sometimes good to vent :)

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    Hi Nocturne , in reply to your question the bowl of icy water is out of the bed at the end on the floor, let your feet out of your duvet/sheet the cold air should bring your temprature down, I got this from another site

    I do suffer night sweats myself and dont know what the cause is however there is a condition called hyperhidrosis this can be treated orally from the group of medications known as anticholinergics, which reduce sweating.

    reading about your treatment from this prehistoric dinasaur pretending to be a doctor, dont be afraid to ask for a second opinion and if your a tiger like me put in a complaint to your local PCT (Primary Care Trust), good luck keep us informed at what happens next….....Cheers Andy

  • Sleepio Member

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    Hi Circadian, Sheila and Andy, your support and sympathy is much appreciated. I think most of us in the sleepio community fall into the category of battling on and not falling into self pity, but a little sympathy occasionally is great! I promise I won't get spoilt. At the time of the appt I was doing the course mentioned elsewhere which was hard work and doing SR with sleepio, so I put the experience with the consultant on one side. Finished my course of study and fell into a very nasty tummy bug, have lost a stone, hence not been very active for 2-3 weeks. I have to return to the gp at some point if only because I'm going to be summoned for a follow up appt with this consultant, and no way am I going. I didn't take what he prescribed when I saw what it was so no point in going anyway. I will have another go with my gp shortly. On it taking ages to get a referral, it was only 2009 (or 10) that NICE guidelines dictated gps had to refer – until then they could run standard blood tests and then say there was nothing wrong with you so you could have antidepressents or counselling. I managed my symptoms (ME including pspd) for 10 years with the help of an excellent herbalist and by being self-employed. The herbalist took everything extremely seriously and carefully prescribed for each symptom. Particularly helpful with the temperature control, especially summer heat, and as soon as I can I will return to her. Because I moved away I thought I'd have another go with the NHS , however I'm coming round again to the conclusion that the NHS will not help me on this and probably in future will continue to manage my own symptoms with carefully prescri bed herbal medicine.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Theres a lot to be said about chinese herbal medicines, when you think lots of their herbal remedies go back thousands of years, there does seem that there must be some basis of their effectiveness. as is acupuncture (for some people).

    I know what you mean about the NHS the referral times are pretty terrible, I have been waiting to see a neurologist for 8 weeks and when phoning was told it should be about another 12 weeks.

    Antway I am going off topic about this particular thread is there anything your herbalist would prescribe for night sweats? if so I would like to know.

    I hope your stomache bug clears up and that you dont lose much more weight, take care and get well soon…...Andy

  • Sleepio Member

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    Thanks for good wishes, I am eating the proverbial lightly boiled egg at the moment so grateful food is staying put. On the herbal medicine, a reputable herbalist will spend at least an hour taking a history, checking pulse etc before prescribing something specific for that person. Although my invoice always lists the herbs the names don't mean much to me as she did me a blend for several symptoms. Some of the herbs you can't buy over the counter anyway. The only other thing I can suggest is trying the Healthspan website. A herbalist is a cost if you get free prescriptions but if you don't it doesn't work out any more expensive than paying for nhs medicines. I used to have about one consultation a year at £30, then she would ring me to see how the medicine was working, and either re-prescribe or adjust as necessary. The medicine itself isn't expensive. Hope that helps. There's a register of qualified practitioners if you google.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Thanks Nocturne for your kind and prompt reply.
    I do not pay for prescriptions myself , however if I had to pay towards consultation and prescription it might well be worth it, and as herbal medicine is non addictive it must be better in the end.
    I will have a google and see what registererd practitioners there are.
    I hope your tummy is settling down and feeling much better, I sometimes suffer with IBS and have lots of sympathy for you, life is sometimes a bitch however this is the hand we have been dealt with so we must do the best with what we have, for me being positive is the best way, I am not a young man, however I have a toygirl and looking after her 3 kids makes life bearable, they are 3 wonderful children and a joy to bring up…thats one positive

    Have a good nights sleep, take care because I care…..Andy

  • Sleepio Member

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    Night sweats during the menopause kicked off my insomnia and though I've been post menopausal for many years, my temperature still fluctuates at night but not daytimes. My partner and I now have separate beds pushed together, and separate quilts so I can thrash around and push the covers on and off without disturbing him. I recall reading something about the hypothalmus determining one's internal thermostat and I think there are supplements you can take to help. I'm a great fan of acupuncture which definitely helps regulate all sorts of things.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Hi Groggy heres what I found out about the hyperthalmus

    The hypothalamus is an area of the brain that produces hormones that control:
    ӢBody temperature
    ӢHunger
    ӢMoods
    ӢRelease of hormones from many glands, especially the pituitary gland
    ӢSex drive
    ӢSleep
    ӢThirst

    Sweating allows the body to regulate its temperature. Sweating is controlled from a center in the preoptic and anterior regions of the brain's hypothalamus, where thermosensitive neurons are located.

    Hope this is helpful …....Andy

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    I have posted before about hyperhydrosis however here is a bit more courtesy of
    Ezinearticles.com….........Thanks

    Hyperhidrosis may sound like a laughing matter, but be assured that it is an issue which many people have to tackle day in day out. To handle the condition in a proper matter, serious medical attention is needed, because the answer for what causes the excessive sweating lies deep in the brain. It is not yet certain what the reason is behind excessive sweating.

    Doctors, however, have raised the issue of a faulty hypothalamus. The hypothalamus is a part in the brain which regulates all sweat-related functions. When the hypothalamus sends off a sign to the sweat nerves in the body, these forward the signals to the sweat glands causing these glands to form sweat. Sweat is important in order for the body to cool down after, for instance, an extensive work-out.

    Usually, we only sweat when we are active or when temperatures are high. But, a person suffering from hyperhidrosis will sweat even when they are just sitting or sleeping. The hypothalamus of these patients is overstrained or gives off the wrong signals. Mostly, hyperhidrosis emerges during childhood. Hyperhydrosis which manifests itself later on in life is mostly due to health issues such as metabolic disorders and should be examined by a doctor for proper medical treatment.

    Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/1293704

  • Sleepio Member

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    Last night was a bad one for me , I felt like I was in an oven

    the sweat was pooring out of my head does anyone think I should see my Gp?, although it might be part of my Fibro as it doesn't happen all the time

    is there medication to treat night sweats?

  • Sleepio Member

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    Hi Andy,

    Like nocturne I also take a load of herbal medicine plus lots of supplements to help with the night sweats. I have been taking them for about 5 months now and I do think they help. However it is quite expensive. It would be so much easier to stay on HRT which now I'm over 60 wouldn't cost anything! I had my consultation over the phone and by filling in a very detailed questionnaire online. Now I just discuss my symptoms each month with her and she adjusts my medicine accordingly and then posts it to me.
    I think if your sweating continues for over a week then perhaps you should see your GP

  • Sleepio Member

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    Hi Sheila

    Thanks for your helpful advice and information, I have been like this for years, however the past 2-3 nights I have been pretty bad, last night I had to throw the duvet back and take of my jimjam top off and I was still sweating, in the end I slept downstairs on the sofa as it seemed much cooler downstairs

    I take on board what you say about herbal remedies I cant really afford to spend much so off to the docs I go, maybe I am going through the male menopause ? mind you my partner gets really hot in the night, I did ask about single beds and thought otherwise once I saw her packing my bags lol

    Thanks for your kind reply…all the best Andy

  • Sleepio Member

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    I am going through the menopause. One of the biggest contributors to my poor sleep is hot flushes. I also have bought the Fit Bit Flex and spent yesterday and last night just before bed trying to work it out. I used the wrist band but can't see how to connect the results to their website. It is really unclear – any suggestions. Thank you.

  • Sleepio Member

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    anyone got any good ides to help counteract heat in the night which is menopausal?

  • Sleepio Member

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    I have heard of pillows that have cold packs in them to help cool a person off. One brand name is called Chill-in Pillow Pad, but I'm sure there are others too. I haven't used one myself but maybe some else out there on the Sleepio air-waves has. Good luck finding something.

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    Hello I've had insomnia coming up to 2 years. I also have a 3 year old daughter so looking after her when ive only had 3-4 hours of sleep is horrible.

    Every night when i go to bed, after around 20mins my skin starts to burn up. I dont sweat but my skin feels like its on fire. I believe this is contributing to me not falling asleep. Its like this for hours. I've tried windows open, blankets and sheets off and recently ive tried sleeping with the fan on but i still cant fall asleep. All my bloods came back clear from the Docs. So im at a loss as the doc said they dont know why im burning up at night. Its frustrating…and oh this happens in the winter as well.

    Does anyone else have this issue or have any thoughts on the matter?
    Thanks

  • Sleepio Member

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    Hi all, thanks for sharing your experiences. I'm pretty new to sleepio, just wanted to offer that some antidepressants cause or worsen night sweats. My sleep doctor increased my wellbutrin thinking depression might underlie the insomnia, but then I was waking up soaking 3 x / night, so it made everything worse, unfortunately. I'd been on a subtherapeutic dose for years but got completely off it and the night sweats are way better. I'm probably perimenopausal, was on effexor for a while and sweated like crazy, when I worked out I'd be dripping way more than the other ladies, didn't know why at the time. Anyway it's a tough call, not to take antidepressants, but for me the main symptom was insomnia and they were making that better not worse. Good luck to you all.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Hi! I suffer from so-called terminal insomnia. I can usually fall asleep easily, but I have been waking up for a longer period of time after 4-5 hours of sleep. Lately this waking is often accompanied by sweating. I am 43 years old which migh put me in the premenopause stage, but I doubt it. I think it might be something psychological as there are things bothering me lately (maybe even subconciously). Because of this waking it i s hard to sleep for the full sleep window (6 hours) as it usually takes me a long time to fall back to sleep, if I manage to at all. Has anybody had similar experiences?

  • Sleepio Member

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    I've had an over heating issue for a very long time (the insomnia thing only for about 5 years). I didn't realize it when I was younger because I lived in a very cold climate (i.e. regularly in the -C) and would have my bedroom window open at night during the winter (much to my father's annoyance until he finally shut of my heating vent and told me to just keep the door closed). During the summers I was just resigned to feeling hot and sweaty since we all were. When I was in uni is when I realized it. Since I could no longer open my windows during the winter, I realized that I would start sweating no matter how little I was wearing or how many layers were on my bed or how cold I could get my room to be. It's only gotten worse the older I get. I can be cold when I fall asleep, but then about an hour later I'm boiling. My skin, especially my core down, physically feels hot to the touch. If I'm sleeping in the same bed as a friend they normally start complaining that I'm too hot and I make them feel hot. I've started to just have an icepack ready and get it when I feel overheated. It doesn't stay cold for very long, but it does help me cool down a little bit which is enough to get me back to sleep most of the time. I recently found out that my maternal grandmother was the same, so whatever causes it is probably hereditary. I think some of us just run hot at night…ie a broken internal thermometer. I don't think it's possible that this is psychological for me.

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