Night heats (and other hormonal symptoms) dont help trying to sleep

If i do get to sleep, the first time i wake, i feel my body heat up all through, especially in my back or front whatever is bed-side down, so i am constantly moving about. Goodness knows how hubby sleeps with my fidgeting…I sleep best when he holds me – i think my body instantly accepts the safety & comfort of it, but when i wake we are apart. So i do get a little sleep if we start like spoons.. but these ruddy night sweats do my head in….

If i get 4 solid hours of sleep i am amazed its normally broken sleep 1st wake around 2ish, then drifting in and out, waking around 4ish & then 5ish as hubby alarm at 5.30 then drift again till i get up around 7.15. That's when i want TO ACTUALLY SLEEP...& can't!

Posted 17 Nov 2011 at 8:28 PM
  • 53 comments
  • 7 helped

Comments

Show older comments
  • Sleepio Member

    • 16 comments
    • 8 helped
    Graduate

    Night sweats during the menopause kicked off my insomnia and though I've been post menopausal for many years, my temperature still fluctuates at night but not daytimes. My partner and I now have separate beds pushed together, and separate quilts so I can thrash around and push the covers on and off without disturbing him. I recall reading something about the hypothalmus determining one's internal thermostat and I think there are supplements you can take to help. I'm a great fan of acupuncture which definitely helps regulate all sorts of things.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 874 comments
    • 213 helped
    Graduate

    Hi Groggy heres what I found out about the hyperthalmus

    The hypothalamus is an area of the brain that produces hormones that control:
    ӢBody temperature
    ӢHunger
    ӢMoods
    ӢRelease of hormones from many glands, especially the pituitary gland
    ӢSex drive
    ӢSleep
    ӢThirst

    Sweating allows the body to regulate its temperature. Sweating is controlled from a center in the preoptic and anterior regions of the brain's hypothalamus, where thermosensitive neurons are located.

    Hope this is helpful …....Andy

  • Sleepio Member

    • 874 comments
    • 213 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    I have posted before about hyperhydrosis however here is a bit more courtesy of
    Ezinearticles.com….........Thanks

    Hyperhidrosis may sound like a laughing matter, but be assured that it is an issue which many people have to tackle day in day out. To handle the condition in a proper matter, serious medical attention is needed, because the answer for what causes the excessive sweating lies deep in the brain. It is not yet certain what the reason is behind excessive sweating.

    Doctors, however, have raised the issue of a faulty hypothalamus. The hypothalamus is a part in the brain which regulates all sweat-related functions. When the hypothalamus sends off a sign to the sweat nerves in the body, these forward the signals to the sweat glands causing these glands to form sweat. Sweat is important in order for the body to cool down after, for instance, an extensive work-out.

    Usually, we only sweat when we are active or when temperatures are high. But, a person suffering from hyperhidrosis will sweat even when they are just sitting or sleeping. The hypothalamus of these patients is overstrained or gives off the wrong signals. Mostly, hyperhidrosis emerges during childhood. Hyperhydrosis which manifests itself later on in life is mostly due to health issues such as metabolic disorders and should be examined by a doctor for proper medical treatment.

    Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/1293704

  • Sleepio Member

    • 874 comments
    • 213 helped
    Graduate

    Last night was a bad one for me , I felt like I was in an oven

    the sweat was pooring out of my head does anyone think I should see my Gp?, although it might be part of my Fibro as it doesn't happen all the time

    is there medication to treat night sweats?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 453 comments
    • 127 helped
    Graduate

    Hi Andy,

    Like nocturne I also take a load of herbal medicine plus lots of supplements to help with the night sweats. I have been taking them for about 5 months now and I do think they help. However it is quite expensive. It would be so much easier to stay on HRT which now I'm over 60 wouldn't cost anything! I had my consultation over the phone and by filling in a very detailed questionnaire online. Now I just discuss my symptoms each month with her and she adjusts my medicine accordingly and then posts it to me.
    I think if your sweating continues for over a week then perhaps you should see your GP

  • Sleepio Member

    • 874 comments
    • 213 helped
    Graduate

    Hi Sheila

    Thanks for your helpful advice and information, I have been like this for years, however the past 2-3 nights I have been pretty bad, last night I had to throw the duvet back and take of my jimjam top off and I was still sweating, in the end I slept downstairs on the sofa as it seemed much cooler downstairs

    I take on board what you say about herbal remedies I cant really afford to spend much so off to the docs I go, maybe I am going through the male menopause ? mind you my partner gets really hot in the night, I did ask about single beds and thought otherwise once I saw her packing my bags lol

    Thanks for your kind reply…all the best Andy

  • Sleepio Member

    • 3 comments
    • 0 helped
    Session 5

    I am going through the menopause. One of the biggest contributors to my poor sleep is hot flushes. I also have bought the Fit Bit Flex and spent yesterday and last night just before bed trying to work it out. I used the wrist band but can't see how to connect the results to their website. It is really unclear – any suggestions. Thank you.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 9 comments
    • 1 helped
    Graduate

    anyone got any good ides to help counteract heat in the night which is menopausal?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 246 comments
    • 97 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    I have heard of pillows that have cold packs in them to help cool a person off. One brand name is called Chill-in Pillow Pad, but I'm sure there are others too. I haven't used one myself but maybe some else out there on the Sleepio air-waves has. Good luck finding something.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 1 comments
    • 0 helped
    Session 3

    Hello I've had insomnia coming up to 2 years. I also have a 3 year old daughter so looking after her when ive only had 3-4 hours of sleep is horrible.

    Every night when i go to bed, after around 20mins my skin starts to burn up. I dont sweat but my skin feels like its on fire. I believe this is contributing to me not falling asleep. Its like this for hours. I've tried windows open, blankets and sheets off and recently ive tried sleeping with the fan on but i still cant fall asleep. All my bloods came back clear from the Docs. So im at a loss as the doc said they dont know why im burning up at night. Its frustrating…and oh this happens in the winter as well.

    Does anyone else have this issue or have any thoughts on the matter?
    Thanks

  • Sleepio Member

    • 1 comments
    • 0 helped
    Graduate

    Hi all, thanks for sharing your experiences. I'm pretty new to sleepio, just wanted to offer that some antidepressants cause or worsen night sweats. My sleep doctor increased my wellbutrin thinking depression might underlie the insomnia, but then I was waking up soaking 3 x / night, so it made everything worse, unfortunately. I'd been on a subtherapeutic dose for years but got completely off it and the night sweats are way better. I'm probably perimenopausal, was on effexor for a while and sweated like crazy, when I worked out I'd be dripping way more than the other ladies, didn't know why at the time. Anyway it's a tough call, not to take antidepressants, but for me the main symptom was insomnia and they were making that better not worse. Good luck to you all.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 12 comments
    • 0 helped
    Graduate

    Hi! I suffer from so-called terminal insomnia. I can usually fall asleep easily, but I have been waking up for a longer period of time after 4-5 hours of sleep. Lately this waking is often accompanied by sweating. I am 43 years old which migh put me in the premenopause stage, but I doubt it. I think it might be something psychological as there are things bothering me lately (maybe even subconciously). Because of this waking it i s hard to sleep for the full sleep window (6 hours) as it usually takes me a long time to fall back to sleep, if I manage to at all. Has anybody had similar experiences?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 10 comments
    • 4 helped
    Graduate

    I've had an over heating issue for a very long time (the insomnia thing only for about 5 years). I didn't realize it when I was younger because I lived in a very cold climate (i.e. regularly in the -C) and would have my bedroom window open at night during the winter (much to my father's annoyance until he finally shut of my heating vent and told me to just keep the door closed). During the summers I was just resigned to feeling hot and sweaty since we all were. When I was in uni is when I realized it. Since I could no longer open my windows during the winter, I realized that I would start sweating no matter how little I was wearing or how many layers were on my bed or how cold I could get my room to be. It's only gotten worse the older I get. I can be cold when I fall asleep, but then about an hour later I'm boiling. My skin, especially my core down, physically feels hot to the touch. If I'm sleeping in the same bed as a friend they normally start complaining that I'm too hot and I make them feel hot. I've started to just have an icepack ready and get it when I feel overheated. It doesn't stay cold for very long, but it does help me cool down a little bit which is enough to get me back to sleep most of the time. I recently found out that my maternal grandmother was the same, so whatever causes it is probably hereditary. I think some of us just run hot at night…ie a broken internal thermometer. I don't think it's possible that this is psychological for me.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 96 comments
    • 19 helped
    Graduate

    I'm interested to hear from anyone who has struggled with their sleep since the onset of the menopause.
    I used to sleep like a baby. I took a good night's sleep totally for granted until just over 6 years ago.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 2 comments
    • 0 helped
    Graduate

    I have struggled with my sleep for the last 9 years since the onset of menopause. I was keen not to take HRT so have battled on as I don't really have any other symptoms only hot flushes and poor sleep.
    I usually wake at least 2-3 times during the night, sometimes I can get back to sleep when the flush has stopped and sometimes I can be awake for ages.
    Other times I can't even get to sleep even though I feel exhausted!
    I try to be very laid back about it and not get stressed about it but it can be difficult when I've only had a few hours sleep on several consecutive days!

  • Sleepio Member

    • 46 comments
    • 10 helped
    Graduate

    I blame the menopause!!! Before the menopause I slept well but during the menopause I had hot flushes about every hour, day and night and this went on for about 15 years. You know how it is – you suddenly wake and are unbearably hot and sweating profusely so you throw back the bed clothes and within minutes you are cold again. I am fortunate in that I would then go back to sleep very quickly. After so many years I think this is now a negative sleep habit. On the whole the night sweats have ceased but I still wake regularly and frequently. I was hoping the sleep restriction might break this bad habit but so far it doesn't seem to be doing so. Perhaps one has to do the SR for longer (oh no!!!)

  • Sleepio Member

    • 11 comments
    • 0 helped
    Graduate

    I gave up working about 5 years ago when my poor sleeping was impacting on my ability to cope with stressful situations. I swapped this 'habit' for the menopause. I began waking every 2 hours at one point. I now sleep for aprox 3 hours at a time but rarely feel refreshed when I waken for the day. Although I don't have to get up for work, it doesn't seem to make any difference. Blackout curtains, no caffeine or eating late. I've changed my pillow and we have a new bed.
    I've had acupuncture and 'Lady magnet' suggestions.
    Any experiences /ideas? Or is this a bit of Mumbo Jumbo?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 46 comments
    • 10 helped
    Graduate

    A lot of what we are advised to do (through the media or on line) is mumbo jumbo and has no scientific basis, however anything to do with the human being is affected by our psychology and so a completely ineffectual intervention may appear to have an effect because it triggered the right psychological response. You seem to have done all the sensible things, so my advice would be to focus entirely on the Sleepio programme and despite how awful it will get, persevere. You hint at stress problems so the various relaxation techniques should help you and with luck the sleep restriction will break the negative sleep habits.
    After 8 weeks I see small signs of improvement for me, so I advise that you hang on in and hopefully it will work for you too

  • Sleepio Member

    • 96 comments
    • 19 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Hi Ozzie, I can understand your scepticism about the effectiveness of certain natural remedies, but I've been using the magnet since September, and it's really reduced my hot flushes, both frequency and intensity. (I've used magnets before for period pains, and tennis elbow, all with good results).
    Another thing I've found effective (no idea why) is green tea. I allow myself 2 builders teas in the morning to wake me up, but the rest of the day I'm green, and this has also helped this year with flushes. (Interestingly, on the odd occasions when I've felt like treating myself to a nice coffee when I'm out, the flushes start again a little later).
    Throughout this menopausal journey I've tried just about everything. Most things haven't worked for me at all. I daren't add up what I've spent in the local health shop, but when you're faced with zero support from your GP, what do you do? I think you've just got to try every single thing you can (within reason!) and see what works for you.
    We're all individuals, and some people find some remedies more effective than others. You've just got to find your thing.
    EO

  • Sleepio Member

    • 11 comments
    • 0 helped
    Graduate

    Thank you Eternal Optimist for your help. You're not the first to mention the magnet. I wonder if it works in conjunction with the green tea. Not sure about giving up coffee but I don't have caffeine after about 4pm anyway. I certainly will pursue the interest in the magnet its just i've not come across anyone who knows anything about them. I guess we just live and learn.
    Thanks again
    Ozzie

Return to top