Live Discussion with Dr Vicki Creanor - 22nd April 2020

Dr Creanor will be hosting a live online discussion here on Wednesday 22nd April, from 8.15pm to 9.45pm British Time or 3.15pm to 4.45pm US Eastern Time.

They will discuss as many topics as possible in the hour and a half and, as always, you are welcome to ask any questions at all about sleep or the Sleepio program. If there are a lot of questions, they may not be able to answer all in the time available, but will try to answer as many as they can.

Please do note that, as per our guidelines, Dr Creanor will not be able to give personal medical advice including those about medication. Their replies to questions will be made in such a way as to help as many people as possible who might have similar issues.

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Posted 16 Apr 2020 at 7:35 PM
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Comments

  • Sleepio Member

    • 11 comments
    • 5 helped
    Graduate

    Hi I wonder if it's the current situation but my sleep pattern seems to have become more erratic again with lower SE and some nights with much less sleep. I am working from home so have a routine for that although I have had even more work and pressure than usual. Also I have been spendng a lot of time and energy trying to sort out shopping arrangments for my elderly mother who lives far away as well as my neighbours who are shielding. So if anything I would have expected to just sleep very readily through being exhausted.

    Also although because I ahev been on the programme quite a while I feel stuck. I can usually go to sleep relatively easily and go back to sleep if I wake in the early hours but if I wake again after I have had 5.5 to 6 hours sleep I find it very difficult to go back to sleep even though I think I do need more sleep (perhaps 7hrs) as I am always tired and often fall asleep on the sofa while watching TV.

    Any thoughts appreciated.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 3 comments
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    Graduate

    At night, I just don't feel tired. I'm in bed for 8 hours but usually only sleep for about 4 hours (unless I take my sleeping mediation). Generally, the nights that I take my mediation and get 7 hours of sleep, I feel great. The nights I don't and get 4 hours of sleep, I feel fine. (I don't drink coffee or eat past 7pm and follow all good bedtime practices.) Should I really only be in bed for 4 hours? My concern is that doctors say 7-8 hours of sleep is what humans need.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 453 comments
    • 184 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Hiya Glisglis,
    I know the lockdown here in the U.K. is affecting many of us…even if we don’t think it is. There is so much we can hear every day then we need to shut off the news.
    Have you tried moving your sleep window by increments of 15 minutes (the same as if the prof had given you those 15 mins) but just move it further so you go to bed a bit later and see after a week of trying, if that moves your brain to sleep through?
    I have been having a few more disturbed nights, and so have other sleepios I have been in touch with…but some of that has been down to the clock adjustment for spring. But I also feel that it is in part, due to the virus and how it is affecting us all in our daily routines…everything has changed the world over. It’s hardly surprising that our sleep should be affected.
    Kurly :)

  • Sleepio Member

    • 453 comments
    • 184 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Am just nipping in here MLM because it’s the weekend and the Live Doctor isn’t here til next Wednesday. So forgive my intrusion!
    Not sure how old you are, but as a fifty something year old, I used to think I should be getting 7-8 hours magical sleep per night. My daughter is 28…I haven’t had good sleep since she was born!
    I’ve been on Sleepio since November. I have realised that you have to settle and enjoy the sleep you get. Mine has gone up from 2.5-4 hours…to 5.5-7 hours sleep. Most mornings I wake up a bit early, but am now able to turn over. Or turn over during the night and not lie awake for several hours at a time. The sleep I seem to be getting is quality…NOT quantity. If you are there..enjoy the sleep you actually get. It may not be the sleep you thought you should have.
    Our bad habits have to be altered but it does take time. I used it be a reader, in bed, every night. Now I read in my down time or during the day. We just get used to a new normal.
    Hope this helps til the doctor is here.
    Kurly :)

  • Sleepio Member

    • 3131 comments
    • 555 helped
    Expert

    Good evening and welcome to the live Sleepio expert session. I'm Dr Vicki Creanor, a clinical psychologist with a special interest in sleep. Please feel free to add any questions you may have about sleep/the Sleepio programme here over the next 90 mins. I look forward to hearing from you…

  • Sleepio Member

    • 3 comments
    • 0 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Hi Vicki,

    Are you on a Livestream right now?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 3131 comments
    • 555 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi there. Thanks for getting in touch. I see you commented here a few days back so hopefully you'll get to see this reply OK.

    I'm sorry to hear you're struggling a bit more with sleep at the moment. It sounds as if there is more stress and anxiety around for you at the moment with the various changes and concerns you have around the current pandemic. This is a very common picture around the world at the moment and it's important to be aware that anxiety may well be higher just now for many of us. So this may be one aspect of the more fragmented sleep you've mentioned. Anxiety and stress play a huge part in damaging previously good sleep routines. To help with this, it may be worth building in some time in the day to do some relaxation or mindfulness exercises (there are some you will have come across in Sleepio already) – but especially into your night time routine. Try to keep as consistent a nighttime routine as possible.

    Working from home is something we are all now having to get used to but it is not always easy and brings its own stresses. Try to make sure your bedroom is free from any work – try and do work elsewhere as this will help your mind distinguish between relaxing/sleeping space and work space.

    You mentioned that you often fall asleep in front of the TV. Try to avoid this as much as possible as this will weaken the bed-sleep association you're trying to build up. Sleep will start to become associated with the sofa, not your bed. Try to get fresh air and exercise each day if possible and if tired in the evening, get up and move around or engage in a more stimulating task so you don't fall asleep.

    I wonder if it makes a difference to you when you go to bed? It may be that if you shift your sleep window you can achieve a longer sleep. Exercise during the day will also help with deeper, longer sleep, as will cutting out caffeine after lunchtime and avoiding alcohol before bed.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 3131 comments
    • 555 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi there yes sorry it just took me a while to reply to the last post but I'm here! I'll answer your post just now :)

  • Sleepio Member

    • 3131 comments
    • 555 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi there – so it sounds as if you're following lots of good sleep habits, or 'hygiene' as we sometimes call it. Over the course of the Sleepio programme, you'll start to learn ways of removing any time you're not sleeping away from the bedroom and this is something that really helps us to make a better association in our brains between bed and sleep (rather than bed and not being able to). So this is an important technique to look out for. Often, other reasons for people not getting a lot of sleep at night include taking naps (even short ones) during the day or an underlying mental health problem, such as depression, anxiety or stress.

    When people take naps, it removes some of the 'sleep pressure' (which builds as we go through the day and become more tired) that is needed for us to feel sleepy at night. For others, when bedtime approaches, anxiety increases as there is a risk of poor sleep, so the body and mind become more alert and therefore not sleepy. I wonder if either of these issues are relevant to you?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 3131 comments
    • 555 helped
    Expert

    We're nearly at the end of our session today. If there are any more general comments/pieces of feedback about these live expert sessions, please feel free to leave them on the separate thread over at the community section of the site…it's so important to get this feedback so we can make these sessions as useful as possible…

  • Sleepio Member

    • 3131 comments
    • 555 helped
    Expert

    That's all for tonight's session – speak to you again soon!

  • Sleepio Member

    • 2 comments
    • 0 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Session 5

    Hi Dr,
    I'm convinced I suffer from sleep paralysis as well as RLS.
    The SP frightens the hell out of me & its something I believe I have suffered since being a very young child.
    The RLS pretty much all if my adult life.Personally I wouldn't say RLS is painful to me but it torments me when its happens,There us no relief & at times it drives me crazy.Your help would be gratefully appreciated.

    Thank you Hetty

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