Live discussion with Dr Vicki Creanor - 1st April

Dr Creanor will be hosting a live online discussion here on Wednesday 1st April, 8.15pm-9.45pm GMT.

She will discuss as many topics as possible in the hour and a half, starting with the most popular questions with answers being given in a way to give the most benefit to the general Community.

To have a say in which questions are answered, either:
+ post a question or comment ahead of the discussion, by clicking the blue ‘Add a comment’ button; or
+ vote on other people’s questions, by clicking the blue ‘Yes’ button underneath the relevant comment.

To keep up with new comments as they are posted you will need to 'refresh' this discussion page.

To do this:

- On PC hit 'Ctrl' and 'R' or the 'F5' key
- On Mac hit 'Command' or 'Apple' and 'R'

Posted 27 Mar 2015 at 12:43 PM
  • 27 comments
  • 3 helped

Comments

Show older comments
  • Sleepio Member

    • 1323 comments
    • 214 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi gin-gin,
    I'm not sure if your question was directed to me or the others in the community, but I have known people's weight to change when they start/come off medication as weight gain/loss is often a side effect. It sounds as if you are seeking the right help for this and trying to find answers through your GP.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 1323 comments
    • 214 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi onezerodark,
    I was wondering if you have spoken to your doctor about your sore knees? Some people do suffer from a sleep problem that involves them acting out their dreams and so their body does move quite a bit during particular stages of sleep – do you think this sounds like what you do? Has anyone else noticed this behaviour that you are aware of on the subconscious level?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 184 comments
    • 89 helped
    Graduate

    Hi Dr. Creanor. In the pro-sleep protocol the Prof says to eat your main meal 3 hours before bedtime. Is this meant to be taken literally or is it really meant to be “no more than” 3 hours before bedtime? My SW starts at 1 a.m. and a 10 p.m. dinner doesn't work. Should I be eating a large snack? I am curious if this has to do with blood sugar levels helping to maintain sleep.
    Cat

  • Sleepio Member

    • 1323 comments
    • 214 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi Lew,
    There are a few things you could try. It sounds as if the very sight of your bed when you return to it is enough to trigger anxiety/negative thoughts. First of all, I would make sure you are sticking to the rule that you only go to bed to sleep (don't lie in past your wake time, don't lie and read/watch TV in bed etc) – I'm sure you're sticking to this, but just to reiterate the importance of this as it will strengthen the link between the sight of your bed and feeling sleepy. Second, I would recommend revisiting your negative thoughts and set aside some time earlier in the day to challenge them so they are less likely to disturb you at night. Sometimes, you can assume the negative thoughts are about specific things, when they may be similar to, “I hope I can get back to sleep…what if I can't??”. You could try and do some relaxation when you are doing the QHR and get out of bed, or you could also look at alternative activities during the QHR time to help you feel more sleepy (something non-stimulating/boring!). Hope that gives you food for thought?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 1323 comments
    • 214 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Ah sorry that has been confusing, Cat. I think what has been meant there is try not to eat too close to bedtime as this can be a stimulant and can hamper efforts to fall asleep. It doesn't mean you need to eat 3 hours before sleep, just avoid food too close to sleeping. Hope that clears things up?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 184 comments
    • 89 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Yes, thank you! Cat

  • Sleepio Member

    • 1323 comments
    • 214 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi Mary, thanks for your post. As much as you probably don't want to hear it, what I would recommend to improve sleep is implementing the quarter hour rule (QHR) and sleep restriction. These are the parts that most people want to drop but that are regarded as very effective in terms of helping sleep get back on track. Is it the QHR you've dropped (getting out of bed when it takes longer than 15 mins to fall asleep) or have you dropped the sleep restriction (creating a sleep window by adding all the time you spend actually sleeping into one block)? Sorry I was a bit unsure what part you had dropped.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 1323 comments
    • 214 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi KG156,
    Thanks for your post. Sorry to hear you've been feeling so anxious…yes, it is very normal indeed – I think most of your fellow Sleepio community users here would agree they have had the same thoughts. When we start treatment programmes, things can get worse before they get better, often because we are suddenly more focussed on the problem as we are now trying to fix it. There is a part in the Sleepio programme which you won't have got to yet (I see you're at session 1) that helps target these challenging thoughts, so you will be shown how to do this in the next couple of weeks. But please be reassured that it is very normal what you are experiencing and I hope you find these techniques helpful when you get to them.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 1323 comments
    • 214 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi Jenwags25, I'd be interested in what others have done to target this problem, but I wonder if it the physical element of having a pet in bed with you of you could substitute this with blankets/hot water bottles? I understand it may not be the physical element, though, and it may be the comfort and safety of having them there, which is harder to replace. Just a thought…

  • Sleepio Member

    • 21 comments
    • 9 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Good evening Dr C, thank you for replying.
    I've talked through my symptoms with my doctor but the aching knees is an odd one, I've suffered from aching knees in the morning for a long time and assumed that they were just cold but recently I've noticed the movement as well and put them together.
    I was lucky enough to see Dr Zaiwalla at John Radcliffe Hospital back in February and I mentioned this to her.
    I know I move around during the night but I didn't think it was enough to cause this amount of pain.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 1323 comments
    • 214 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    I wonder if it's worth noting how much you move around during the night and keeping a diary of the frequency of your movements so that you have a record? Sometimes that helps us see whether we are moving more or less than we had expected – and it may help to determine whether the movement could be enough to trigger knee problems? What did Dr Zaiwalla say?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 21 comments
    • 9 helped
    Graduate

    Unfortunately it's not something I'm immediately aware of until the morning when I wake up with aching knees/joints, I am wondering if this is what's causing me such poor quality sleep every single night. I've been trying to find an affordable video camera with night vision to record myself sleeping but I'm not able to find anything at a sensible price.
    I'm still waiting for Dr Zaiwalla's report to come back with the next steps,

  • Sleepio Member

    • 1323 comments
    • 214 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Do you know what came first – the poor sleep or the sore knees?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 21 comments
    • 9 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    I'm pretty sure it's the poor sleep, I've suffered from tis since around 15 and I'm now 38!

  • Sleepio Member

    • 1323 comments
    • 214 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    onezerodark, you may find this article helpful from the library. It is about a form of relaxation that can help joint pain. There is a downloadable file available, too, which you can listen to to help you with this. I have copied and pasted the article to save you searching for it. It relates to session 2 of the programme….

    What is Autogenic Training and what does it involve?

    Autogenic Training, a popular relaxation technique, was first developed decades ago by Drs Johannes Schultz and Wolfgang Luthe in Germany. The emphasis of this approach is on developing sensations of warmth and heaviness in your body, allowing people to 'let go' and relax more deeply. It may therefore, be particularly useful for those with muscle or joint problems or pain.

    During Autogenic Training, people may visualize a peaceful scene whilst repeating Autogenic phrases (like 'heaviness' and 'warmth'). These phrases will typically be focused on one specific body region at a time (e.g. “my left arm is heavy”). Focus may be placed on different body regions, pairing them with Autogenic phrases, helping to induce a state of full-body relaxation.

    You can download the Autogenic Training MP3 from the Downloads section in your Case File.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 21 comments
    • 9 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Thank you for your help this evening.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 1323 comments
    • 214 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    No problem – I think it's worth hearing what the medical doctors say first then working back from that. The relaxation may help too.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 1323 comments
    • 214 helped
    Expert

    we have 10 minutes left of the session – any more burning questions folks?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 1323 comments
    • 214 helped
    Expert

    thanks for your company everyone – speak to you again soon.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 38 comments
    • 3 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Hi Dr Creanor ; Thank you for your helpful suggestions.Just to clarify, it is inaccurate that the very sight of my bed triggers anxiety and negative thoughts. The situation I described does not happen all the time and it is just a sense of being keyed up , but no specific negative thought. Rather as the Prof describes as just thinking about thinking.Your suggestions are good and will be kept in mind. Lew

Return to top