Live discussion with Dr Simon Kyle - 6th May

Dr Kyle will be hosting a live online discussion here on Wednesday 6th May, 7pm-8.30pm BST.

He will discuss as many topics as possible in the hour and a half, starting with the most popular questions with answers being given in a way to give the most benefit to the general Community.

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Posted 30 Apr 2015 at 4:36 PM
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  • Sleepio Member

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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    thanks for message Talaat. I've never encountered the experiences you're reporting. Certainly, if you feel the relaxation exercises are having an adverse effect/causing discomfort then it is wise to stop doing them for the time being. Of course, these experiences may also be unrelated so if you are worried it is always best to speak with your doctor in the first instance.

  • Sleepio Member

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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    thanks biddyp – congratulations on your success so far. one thing you could try is to experiment with the position of the window, delaying it slightly? Have you always been a more morning person? another thought is with summer approaching (?!), sunlight in morning may be contributing to earlier rise-times (have you noticed an effect)? If you are not able to return to sleep, this could in part indicate that the brain is restored appropriately/adequately by obtained sleep, but do you still have daytime problems with e.g. energy? ultimately the important factor is how you feel during day rather than total hours (which can vary from person to person)

  • Sleepio Member

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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    thanks JackM. I fully understand. There are (cognitive) strategies, introduced later in the course, which try and target sleep-related anxiety helping to reduce these sometimes distressing feelings. This can help change your approach and thoughts about sleep. but if you are concerned it might be worth discussing how you feel with GP/doctor.

  • Sleepio Member

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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    HI JennyB, good question. you've just described a frequent experience for me! snoozing like this may indicate that you still have a sleep debt and/or that you are attempting to rise from bed at a time that is inconsistent with your internal body-clock. subsequent sleepio sessions will help tailor a new bed and risetime strategy so go with your normal routine for now and hopefully in later sessions you will see some changes to your levels of morning alertness, and reduction of snoozing.

  • Sleepio Member

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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    thanks lindaquilter. very similar experiences to another user, so I've pasted the response below for your consideration:

    one thing you could try is to experiment with the position of the window, delaying it slightly? Have you always been a more morning person? another thought is with summer approaching (?!), sunlight in morning may be contributing to earlier rise-times (have you noticed an effect)? If you are not able to return to sleep, this could in part indicate that the brain is restored appropriately/adequately by obtained sleep, but do you still have daytime problems with e.g. energy? ultimately the important factor is how you feel during day rather than total hours (which can vary from person to person)

  • Sleepio Member

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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    thank you Talaat, as advised above I think it is unlikely to be a carry-over effect of the relaxation exercises. sometimes if already feeling anxious, and then trying to induce relaxation, one can experience increased levels of stress/arousal, but this is rare. but stopping the exercises should give you a sense if they are involved or not. If you are concerned it is always best to consult with your doctor in the first instance, who will also advise on sleeping pills and medications.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Expert

    thanks Tigermom. hopefully some of the sleepio strategies recently introduced and to be introduced will have a positive effect on these awakenings.
    here are also some articles I put together that may be relevant and of interest:

    https://www.sleepio.com/blog/2012/08/02/improving-sleep-in-postmenopausal-women/

    https://www.sleepio.com/articles/sleep-science/menopause-and-sleep-problems/

  • Sleepio Member

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    Graduate

    Hi Dr. Kyle,

    I went throughout the course and the Sleepio techniques worked for me perfectly. However, sometimes I absolutely senselessly avoid the techniques, despite I know I will have difficulties to sleep, almost like I had some strange addiction to exhaust myself by not sleeping…or like I had some sort of fear from sleeping.

    Do you have any idea why one could have such feelings? Or simply overcoming oneself and sticking to the routine is the solution?

    Thanks

  • Sleepio Member

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    Expert

    thanks blumy. these are very common experiences in the early phases, particularly with the quarter of an hour rule and SR (to be introduced later). So I think it is worth sticking with it for now and perhaps re-assessing in a few days/next session. these strategies can also be viewed as liberating you from having to “choose” or (over) think about how sleep might be tonight/tomorrow etc; rather they allow you to give over control to our biological drives, where the aim is to reinstate feelings of sleepiness and then sleep. so limiting variability and maintaining a stable schedule is ideal approach but it's worth seeing how it goes over a few nights…

  • Sleepio Member

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    Expert

    Hi Scott1981 – certainly many psychoactive medications can induce withdrawal symptoms as you describe, and more probable if abruptly stopped. but it sounds like you have been tapering gradually (and always best to do this under guidance/knowledge of GP)
    the strategies you will be introduced to over the next few sessions will aim to get your sleep schedule back on track and reduce the night-to-night variability, and certainly from scientific literature have been shown to help those on, off, and coming off medications (e.g. sleeping pills)

  • Sleepio Member

    • 47 comments
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    Graduate

    Dr. Kyle – I have had good success with Sleepio. Average sleep time is up as is SE.

    Sleep maintenance has always been my problem (and seems to be this week's theme). After doing so well, I have had a tough week. What do you recommend to avoid allowing one or two bad night's sleep snowballing into a whole week?

  • Sleepio Member

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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    thanks Trini_gyul… your expriences are very common and can be helped with sleepio strategies. I see you are relatively new to the course, so best to work through the sessions and also read some of the articles within the library to help support your learning. good luck!

  • Sleepio Member

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    Expert

    thanks miki_mikiweer. good to hear you have made some progress – is this a recent phenomenon? often the key may lie in relation to your pattern and timing of daytime meals and episodes of e.g. stress. different types of medication can also influence the occurrence of eating during the middle of the night. if you feel like it is persisting and becoming a problem it is worth discussing with your GP.

  • Sleepio Member

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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi lizzbrown. the sleepio strategies can work almost as well in all of the outlined circumstances. Ultimately you will likely want to get to a position where you can sleep without sleep aids, so as long as you taper slowly and under guidance of GP then it really is a personal choice. For some who take sleeping pills, they may report that sleep meds assist with adhering to some of the sleep recommendations but you are best placed to judge that.

  • Sleepio Member

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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi geojude – it may be be that you need to slightly weaken your sleep window (what is it just now?), to make it more achievable and assist with re(establishing) a pattern again. certainly, avoiding napping and have a fixed risetime (i.e. going back to sleepio basics) will help reduce the variability you are experiencing. Did you find benefit from the sleepio course previously?

    It is also worth considering/checking that you don't have any other problems with sleep that could lead to enhanced daytime sleepiness e.g. breathing pauses during the night.

  • Sleepio Member

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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    thanks natalia. certainly, in the early weeks and months post-graduation from the sleepio programme, there is greater “cost” to not implementing the sleepio strategies. but as time passes and your sleep-wake pattern becomes robust and stable, small deviations should have little impact (just like a normal sleeper). the idea in time is for you not to consciously review and consider strategies all the time (again like a good sleeper). this may take some further weeks and can vary from person to person

  • Sleepio Member

    • 17 comments
    • 3 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Thanks for the reply. Yes, my sleep efficiency increased appreciably during the Sleepio program.

    I believe that I have breathing pauses if I am on my back; however, I have trained myself to sleep on my side and when checked for sleep apnea on my side, has been negative.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Graduate

    My sleep window is 10:30 to 4:45.

  • Sleepio Member

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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    HI glider guy – investigating any potential patterns for the awakenings (e.g. stress, lifestyle factors) is a good place to start? but if nothing obvious emerges it could be (like many good sleepers) natural variation or random poor nights. avoiding potentially negative compensatory strategies (e.g. napping, altering timing of sleep) is the best way to respond, as well as mentally reassuring yourself that your pattern will return

  • Sleepio Member

    • 1192 comments
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    Expert

    thanks all for great questions. will try and address any I have missed at later date. good luck and “chat” next time

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