Live Discussion with Dr Simon Kyle - 4th April

Dr Kyle will be hosting a live online discussion here on Wednesday 4th April 7pm-8pm.

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Posted 30 Mar 2012 at 8:50 AM
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  • Sleepio Member

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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Thanls Dr Kyle
    The second part of the question is whether relaxation / imagery has any effect on the broken sleep? Obvioulsy it can be used for prolonged wakefulness during the night, but does it affect the brief arousals when undertaken before sleep at night?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 137 comments
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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Thank you Dr Kyle. The factor I have noticed most is if my mind is racing, which happens a lot – mostly due to work pressures!

  • Sleepio Member

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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi JULIESNASHALL, great question. certainly there is evidence that light can help both mood and sleep. have a read of an article we posted on seasonal effects on sleep:
    Seasonal effects on sleep

  • Sleepio Member

    • 868 comments
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    Graduate

    Thanks Dr. Kyle, I’m afraid I’m a bit tardy coming to the discussion. My sleepy tired window is often about 9 or so if I’ve had a busy and physical day.

    I have ME and am improving gradually but know that I need to have my sleep stable and refreshing before it will be helpful in further recovery. I take need to take multiple rests during the day, although I now rarely nap.

    My SR is 10-6. Sometimes when I force myself to stay up until 10 my sleepy tiredness has gone and I might not get it back until 11 or even 12. With a 6am SR wakening time I’m not getting the sleep that I feel I need and it is also often in two parts. .

    Interesting how long it may take me to get SR down to a permanent habit. Most habits don’t take that long to form .I will persevere with SR and hope I can get the habit of good sleep back.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Expert

    thanks Chrispy, it can do in theory – although there is not so much scientific work on this specific question. For example, take an individual who is stressed, prior to sleep, despite falling asleep relatively quickly, tehy will have several brief awakenings during the night and their mentation (thought content) is often around the particular stressor. Emptying one's mind and relaxing sufficiently prior to sleep can reduce mentation during both sleep and the brief awakenings from sleep. It may also alter one's threshold for awakening from sleep – though more science around this is necessary.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Expert

    Thanks lonepine77 – very interesting. have you found these events have decreased through sleepio? There is a condition called night-eating syndrome ,where people wake up with a compulsion to eat. although, overall, there is litle known regarding the mechanisms. we also have an article on food and sleep, which we might update further. link here:
    Food and sleep

  • Sleepio Member

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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Thanks – interesting. Is there any research currently being carried out?

    It is very diificult (if not impossible) to work out whether the arousals are due to PLMD. But if that is the problem for me, then I need to accept the limitations imposed by it and work out a way around it. There is no point in flogging a dead horse in pursuing unbroken sleep through SR.

  • Sleepio Member

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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Hello Suella, I am a recent graduate and have wondered how long the SR would last for me. I have come to the conclusion that starting SR is rather like starting a diet, it has to become a way of life albeit with gradual extension of the hours in bed. At the moment I have a 5.5 hour window in bed and with that I get a reasonable night's sleep. I try to stick to a regular routine as you would do with a child who is having difficulty sleeping. Now I have decided this is going to be long term I can be more relaxed about it. Good luck.

  • Sleepio Member

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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    thanks Suella – you sound like you are ready to give SR another, thorough go. It might also be worth considering whether you are attempting sleep at a time that is not best suited to your body clock? do you always feel groggy in the morning and do you wake up with/by an alarm clock?

  • Sleepio Member

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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    As far as the website diary is concerned, time awake during the night is treated the same whether you are in bed or up and about. Thus SE is time asleep as a percentage of time between retiring to bed and getting up in the morning. Hope that helps.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Expert

    thanks for your comment Tingle.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 199 comments
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    Graduate

    I have noticed that there seems to a shortage of posts from 'undergraduates'. Have numbers of new recruits gone down? If so is that following the introduction of fees?

  • Sleepio Member

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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    thanks Chrispy. Surprisingly there is not that much research in this area. It requires in-lab experimental paradigms, perhaps with the delivery of noises/sounds during sleep to determine if arousal threshold/sensory processing changes as a function of treatment. Some preliminary research suggests that certain brain frequencies associated with sensory processing during sleep do decrease after CBT-based techniques, so this combined with subjective reports of deeper sleep are promising.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 143 comments
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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Many thanks for your reply Dr Kyle. Since being on sleepio & RS, I find I wake up x1 in the night. That's when I still want to eat. I think it may take some time to alter this routine.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 143 comments
    • 25 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Many thanks for your reply Dr Kyle. Since being on sleepio & RS, I find I wake up x1 in the night. That's when I still want to eat. I think it may take some time to alter this routine.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 199 comments
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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    It must be difficult and expensive research to carry out on any scale. perhaps that (at least partly) explains why it has taken so long to get going!

  • Sleepio Member

    • 199 comments
    • 96 helped
    Graduate

    p.s. Keep up the good work!

  • Sleepio Member

    • 1192 comments
    • 306 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    thanks lonepine77, great, see how it goes and if it continues to bother you speak to your GP, as there is some evidence that certain treatments can be effective.

  • Sleepio Member

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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    thanks chrispy!

  • Sleepio Member

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    Expert

    OK, thanks everyone, that's us for tonight. good luck for the week and speak next time. best wishes.

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