Live Discussion with Dr Simon Kyle - 12th February

Dr Simon Kyle will be hosting a live online discussion here on Wednesday 12th February 7-8pm.

He will discuss as many topics as possible in the hour, starting with the most popular questions. Answers will be given in a general way to give the most benefit to the general Community.

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Posted 6 Feb 2014 at 11:20 AM
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  • Sleepio Member

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    Expert

    great to have you joining us Bryony!

  • Sleepio Member

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    Hi singh57, I see you have recently joined and are on session 1. Each week you will be guided through evidence-based techniques and strategies by the Prof that will improve sleep quality and limit the impact of poor sleep on how you feel and function. One thing to say is that poor sleep and stress/anxiety often go hand-in-hand and so, in addition to the sleepio programme, if you feel that anxiety and stress are affecting how you function during the day it might be worth considering discussing with your GP too. Certainly, the research data suggests that improving sleep can also have positive effects on anxiety and stress levels .

  • Sleepio Member

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    Thank you Geeta. Couple of quick questions – have you always been a morning person (retiring to bed early and rising early?) what is your historical sleep-wake pattern? Another thing to note (and before I get presumptuous!) is that ageing is associated with a normal advancing of the sleep period (i.e. going to bed and waking up earlier).

  • Sleepio Member

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    Expert

    Thanks for your comments MMS. This is encouraging advice for Geeta. Sleep restriction can be difficult for the first few weeks/up to a month. safety is important though, so if you feel very sleepy in the morning, you should avoid driving or operating dangerous machinery. sleepiness does tend to alleviate over a few weeks as MMS notes

  • Sleepio Member

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    great question Twinks. If one suspects an underlying sleep problem (e.g. Restless legs, sleep apnea), then it is advisable to deal with this in the first instance. It may still be possible to derive benefit from CBT for insomnia, however, since we know that insomnia can become learned over time and may become an independent issue requiring focussed intervention. But always best to first consult with health professional if suspecting another sleep problem.

  • Sleepio Member

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    excellent question MMS – here is an article I wrote about nicotine and sleep last year: http://www.sleepio.com/blog/2013/01/18/smoking-and-sleep/

  • Sleepio Member

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    Expert

    Great questions Marie Elaine and Dettie – both absolutely right… check out these two articles I compiled:

    http://www.sleepio.com/articles/sleep-science/menopause-and-sleep-problems/
    http://www.sleepio.com/articles/sleep-science/hormones-and-sleep-a-two-way-street/

  • Sleepio Member

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    Expert

    Hi Marie Elaine and Dettie – Both of your comments relate to the menopause so I thought I'd comment on them together. Hope that's ok. You are not alone in finding sleep more problematic as a result of menopausal changes, research has shown that women going through the menopause tend to report poorer sleep quality and changes in electrophysiological measures. There is in fact an article on this in the library if you'd like more information. The techniques learnt through sleepio are still very appropriate though, so keep going with them. And if you're concerned about the impact of hormonal changes particularly, you can always speak to your GP. Marie Elaine I notice you're a graduate of the programme, have you noticed any changes in your sleep through the course?

  • Sleepio Member

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    Hi RAYBIN – just glanced at BWE. as far as I can tell, not any solid evidence for improving chronic poor sleep. The principle might be consistent though: quieting down the electrical activity of the brain may help with de-arousal and sleep initiation. but scientific evidence is needed. Take a scientific approach: it might be best to try and only do one of the programmes at once, since you will not be sure what is conferring benefit…
    what does it involve you doing?

  • Sleepio Member

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    Graduate

    I just listen to the download for 10 mins. Some recordings go on for up to an hour. Since I tried BE I have slept better. It is supposed to simulate meditation. As I have never done meditation, I cannot comment.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Graduate

    I forgot to add that last night I had my best sleep for ages. I awoke at about 2.30. Deep breathing and imagery did not work for me. I listened to BE and I fell asleep shortly after the recording finished…and in all, I slept for 7 hours. My norm is 5 hours

  • Sleepio Member

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    Expert

    thanks Raybin. very interesting… it may well be that it has helped. being a researcher I tend to be conservative about interpreting the data on just a few nights and if it has not been tested against a placebo intervention (like sleepio has been). Certainly at the very least, though, it is unlikely to have negative or interfering effects… so I'd be keen to hear from you next week to see how you get on. Implementation of the sleepio programme techniques will give you the best chance of continued and evolving sleep improvements

  • Sleepio Member

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    Graduate

    Hi Raybin,

    I'm going to post a brief question to you re: Brainwave Entrainment (not entertainment) :) on your sleepio page. If you would go there once this chat is done?

    Thanks,

    Tink

  • Sleepio Member

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    Graduate

    My main problem is that I still waken every night at between 2.30 and 3.30. If I can do imagery on any night it works for me. But, sometimes, like last night, for some reason I can't concentrate enough to do it so before BE, I would just get up and never go sleepy before the end of my SW. As I said earlier, since BE, if imagery doesn't work, BE seems to.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Expert

    Thanks for joining tonight folks, some very good questions.
    One short announcement to make is that
    we're running a survey with Nottingham University to understand what members think about the community. We'd really appreciate your thoughts – it will only take 10 minutes to complete, here is the link:

    https://www.survey.bris.ac.uk/nottingham/sleepiosurvey

    Thank you and speak next time.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Graduate

    Hello Raybin, thank you for your enquiry regarding Brainwave Entertainment. Having just looked at this, it's definitely something I'm going to try especially as a calming technique and for de-stressing! It's impressive that it worked so effectively for you! Thanks again!

  • Sleepio Member

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    Graduate

    Thanks for your response. It is very useful. I am currently under the care of a neurologist for RLS and have not had an effective response to the usual treatments (gabapentin, tamazepam, zopiclone and ropinerole). I am very keen to try all non pharmaceutical options before proceeding with any further medications as I have found that although I sleep better when taking them, I feel “worse” more tired and fuzzy headed than when I am sleep deprived. I will certainly continue with the the CBT for the moment.

  • Sleepio Member

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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Hi Dr Simon Kyle, With regards to my natural awakening cycle, I have always been early to bed and early to rise. A good night would be 9.30pm – 7.00pm. With regards to age – I just turned 40 this year and my sleep challenges have with with me for 4 years – I'm not sure age is a factor – but happy to consider if you think so. I'm concerned that I'll be stuck with a 4am awakening as supposed to the 5am that I have been struggling with. I hope you can help.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Graduate

    Hi Bryony
    Yes I have. My sleep has improved although I still wake up nearly every night round about 4am, I have been able to get back to sleep and that's brilliant. For years I have woken and stayed in bed desperately trying, failing, to get back to sleep and felt exhausted by lack of sleep and effort of trying so hard. The SR has been tough, but I think delaying bedtime has helped me get to sleep quicker. I always read in bed, thinking that helped me get to sleep and I felt dependent on that routine, and was really surprised that I got to sleep more quickly without reading, and also after wakenings. I do miss reading in bed, though!

  • Sleepio Member

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    Graduate

    Hi marie elaine, sadly I, too, miss reading in bed, but am sleeping much better since I gave it up! Giving up reading in bed has also much improved RSI and bad back problems

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