Live Discussion with Dr Kirsty Horne - 9th October

Dr Horne will be hosting a live online discussion here on Wednesday 9th October 7pm-8pm (GMT).

She will discuss as many topics as possible in the hour, starting with the most popular questions with answers being given in a way to give the most benefit to the general Community.

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Posted 4 Oct 2013 at 12:18 PM
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  • Sleepio Member

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    Thanks sleepsound.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Hi Sleepsound, glad to hear your sleep is continuing to improve. Your idea sounds like it would be useful. I believe generally research studies have found most evidence for multi-modal CBT programmes, such as Sleepio and individual components of this, like sleep restriction, progressive relaxation, stimulus control (using bed only for sleep, not lying awake in bed for lengthy periods) and paradoxical thinking; however, I believe you are right- depending on an individual’s specific difficulty with sleep, different components will be most effective for them. We also know that sleep hygiene alone is not effective in the long-term for primary insomnia- although it is a useful component of the multi-model programme.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Graduate

    Hi Dr. Kristy, Just joined in.

  • Sleepio Member

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    thanks Dream on

  • Sleepio Member

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    Hi Zofia, I’m pleased to hear that your sleep is improving. I don’t see any reason based on what you have said, that sleep restriction would not help you at this stage. Can I ask how old you are? Most healthy adult sleepers get 7-9 hours sleep a night, although the average amount of sleep declines as we age. Applying all the components of Sleepio together should certainly help improve your sleep even further.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Sounds promising strummer- thanks for your input.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Hi Sleepsound, I see what you mean. I will pass your question to one of the technical people to advise on this issue. Thanks.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Hi Angief, thanks for joining us.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Hi Angief, was there something in particular you wanted to know about non-restorative sleep? Non-restorative sleep is a subtype of insomnia, whereby one might have relatively ‘normal’ latency to fall asleep, and little/no wakefulness during the night. This can mean several things. For example, non-restorative sleep may reflect another underlying sleep disorder (e.g. limb movements, sleep-breathing disturbance), or an associated underlying medical illness like Fibromyalgia, Chronic fatigue or chronic pain. In these latter medical conditions, there has been published evidence of altered sleep macro and micro structure, as well as studies showing improvements in sleep through CBT-based methods. Non-restorative sleep can also occur in the absence of other conditions. If you believe you have non-restorative sleep, it might help to have other conditions ruled out by your GP, you might want to consider changing the timing of your sleep window, so that it fits better with your clock or circadian phase. Or you might need to extend your window in order to receive more sleep.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Hi again Elf, sorry you are confused. In the situation you describe, if you do not return to bed then you would mark 2am as your rising time. You would have 12am as your bed time, record how long it took you to fall asleep, length of time asleep, number of awakenings, final waking time (2am) and rising time (also 2am). You might find the following article useful: https://www.sleepio.com/library/article/how-to-fill-in-your-sleep-diary/

  • Sleepio Member

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    Hi Dr Kirsty, thank you that helps alot.

  • Sleepio Member

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    You're welcome, glad it was helpful.

  • Sleepio Member

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    10 minutes left- any more questions tonight?

  • Sleepio Member

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    Thanks. I think I have non-restorative sleep because I sleep very lightly most of the night, almost as if I'm awake. However I do also have frequent awakenings but am able to get back to sleep pretty fast. My sleep study was normal. I have an appt with my GP in a month. I'll mention it to him. I was really wondering if any other tools have been identified to assist with NRS? MY SW is 8 hours. I know I could sleep longer in the am but that wouldn't change what happens in the night.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Graduate

    Hi again Dr Kirsty. If you are answering others before the time is up then I can ask this again next week. Last night I slept at the beginning of the night and then 20 mins before my window was to end, I felt sleepy tired again. Partly because I was anxious I would not sleep if I went to bed for 20mins and also felt what was the point, I stayed up on the couch and fell asleep anyway for about 15mins. What should I have done. In hindsight it probably did nothing for my sleep/bed connection.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Graduate

    Hi again, I'm interested in reading the research re: chronic pain and altered sleep structure. I've had migraines for over 45 years. Maybe that has something to do with it.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Hi Angief, that’s good you have had a sleep study and it was found to be normal. I’m not aware of any specific techniques to help with NRS I’m afraid. If you are waking frequently, it might be worth shortening your SW again to see if that makes a difference. Maybe also try going back to the basics with Sleepio and ensuring you are implementing all the techniques. You might also want to look into sleep state misperception http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_state_misperception

  • Sleepio Member

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    Hi Elf, that is a difficult situation. It’s unlikely you would have fallen asleep quickly enough and had any quality sleep before needing to rise again- I think I would have been tempted to just get up if I was you. Unfortunate you ended up sleeping on the couch however, at least you still managed to get up at your set rise time.

  • Sleepio Member

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    I'm afraid we are out of time. Thanks to everyone who joined the session tonight and for the interesting questions. I hope my replies helped you. Sleep well!

  • Sleepio Member

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    Angief, you might also like to look at Proessor Espie's article: https://www.sleepio.com/library/article/can-you-think-youre-awake-when-actually-youre-asle/

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