Live Discussion with Dr Kirsty Horne - 30th October

Dr Horne will be hosting a live online discussion here on Wednesday 30th October 7pm-8pm (GMT).

She will discuss as many topics as possible in the hour, starting with the most popular questions with answers being given in a way to give the most benefit to the general Community.

To have a say in which questions are answered, either:
+ post a question or comment ahead of the discussion, by clicking the blue ‘Add a comment’ button; or
+ vote on other people’s questions, by clicking the blue ‘Yes’ button underneath the relevant comment.

To keep up with new comments as they are posted you will need to 'refresh' this discussion page.

To do this:

- On PC hit 'Ctrl' and 'R' or the 'F5' key
- On Mac hit 'Command' or 'Apple' and 'R'

Posted 24 Oct 2013 at 4:10 PM
  • 51 comments
  • 20 helped

Comments

Show older comments
  • Sleepio Member

    • 341 comments
    • 25 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    With regards to your second question, I wonder if you have any ideas about the cause of this? What time of day are you exercising? What time is bed time? Does this occur every time you exercise or may it have coincided with something else and just be a coincidence that you exercised that day? It’s encouraging to hear you are getting some good nights. Sorry to answer your questions with more questions but it would help me to understand your situation if I knew a little more.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 341 comments
    • 25 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    thanks Angief

  • Sleepio Member

    • 341 comments
    • 25 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    With regards to your third question, have you tried just adding 15 minutes to your bed or rising time to extend the sleep window? Are you falling asleep quickly at present and sleeping for a solid 5.5 hours? If so, it may be that this is the amount of sleep you need. Are you napping at all through the day? Are you exercising regularly? Again, more questions- with more info, I will be more able to help you.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 341 comments
    • 25 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Hi Ewa, I think I recall you asking Dr Keenan questions in the session last week and saying that you cardiologist advised you to remain in bed- is this correct? If so, I also would not contradict them. I would agree that remaining in bed and trying to relax and slow down your breathing would be helpful- you want to develop a positive association between bed and sleep (and also relaxation). I imagine that learning to relax in your bed would help your sleep in the long run. Do you have panic attacks through the day also? I hope you are finding the CBT therapist helpful for this.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 341 comments
    • 25 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Hi datagatherer, you will learn how to challenge negative thoughts and other cognitive techniques in session 4. The positive thoughts that will help you really depend on the negative thoughts you are having. So, for example, if you are telling yourself, “I will never get to sleep” or “I won’t cope tomorrow”, you could challenge these by telling yourself that you always drift off to sleep eventually and even on very little sleep, you do cope the following day despite being tired (as you say, once you’re up and going, you’re fine). Can you give me some ideas of the types of negative thoughts you are having?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 341 comments
    • 25 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Hi again Ewa, well done on achieving such a high SE and glad to hear there has been an improvement overall in the last 5 weeks. It sounds like you are really struggling to stay awake in the early evening. I’m not surprised you feel wide awake at 12 if you have already had a good 3 hours sleep (there won’t be enough sleep pressure). You can try winding down activities and getting things ready for the day ahead in the evening, slow things down but if you find you are falling into a deep sleep at 9pm, I would try not to sit down- maybe continue doing something mentally or physically engaging but just doing it slower. Perhaps listen to music a bit louder or open a window to get some fresh air- could you even phone someone for a chat to keep yourself awake? If this was happening during the day I would suggest you go outside, do something active or have a caffeinated drink; however, these ideas are not practical at this time of night. What about shifting your sleep window to a more suitable time so you are going to bed earlier and getting up earlier?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 341 comments
    • 25 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Hi Websipe, despite your fitness tracker saying you are awake, it sounds like you must be at least in a light sleep if you are snoring. I would only use the QHR if you are fully awake and alert after the quarter of an hour. I would count the time you describe as time asleep.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 341 comments
    • 25 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    interesting theory Websipe! you might be right, try using relaxation techniques to relax your mind and body prior to going to bed and see if this helps.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 11 comments
    • 4 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    So If I pop into full alertness after this kind of twilight sleep--I should give myself another 15 minutes, even though it feels like I have been laying there for a while?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 341 comments
    • 25 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    yes, that's what I'd recommend.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 11 comments
    • 4 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Thanks for your replies! I have also taken to doing foam rolling out tight muscles.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 341 comments
    • 25 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    what's foam rolling?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 341 comments
    • 25 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Ahaa- I looked it up. Looks like a good idea as if you are in pain it could be another factor affecting your sleep. Does it work?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 341 comments
    • 25 helped
    Graduate

    Any more questions in the last 5 minutes?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 11 comments
    • 4 helped
    Graduate

    I think foam rolling works amazingly well. It is basically a self administered deep tissue massage. It can be painful in the moment, but is followed by immediate relaxation (often of muscles I didn't even know were tense). Pain has not been an issue per se, but some times feeling restless/tight is distracting, especially if I have been awake a while.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 341 comments
    • 25 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    that sounds great, thanks for telling us about it.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 341 comments
    • 25 helped
    Graduate

    Thanks for joining the session and for all your questions and comments in response to each other also, see you next week and sleep well!

  • Sleepio Member

    • 1692 comments
    • 341 helped
    Graduate

    Ewa, I'm just wondering at what time you take the diazepam and perhaps that has something to do with your being so sleepy in the evening. It might be a good idea to tell your doctor just how sleepy you are, if you haven't already. You also posted that you wake up in the night sweating so at some point you are falling asleep but not at MN. Is there anyway you can consolidate these two sleep periods?
    Angie

  • Sleepio Member

    • 258 comments
    • 63 helped
    Graduate

    Thanks, Dr. Horne. I am taking a non-Rx sleep aid called Kavinace. It contains an amino acid that's called Phenibut, and it does aid my sleep quality and sleep efficiency, so it's worth continuing. It seems to have a residual effect of making me calm and have less energy, which is a tradeoff. With this aid my SE goes from 50% to 75% and my SQ goes from poor to fair. I do not want to take an Rx sleeping pill for all the well known reasons. So for now I take this aid and pursue CBT. I don't plan to take it long term. If I can wean myself from all sleep aids, that would be great. I do see that I can pursue this CBT with this sleep aid. It's early for me as I just started week 2. Anyone else is free to comment too. Take Care.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 62 comments
    • 8 helped
    Graduate

    Dear Dr Kirsty Horne,
    Apologies for missing your live session. Thank you for your reply. You asked for more info.
    I am following all of the course fastidiously! The sleep problem started way before the low carb diet started--which diet I have done in the past without adverse effects. I do have dairy in moderation, but could try yogurt before bed. I don`t go to bed hungry or full. I exercise in the afternoon in moderation 3 times a week. As you say it may be something else that makes it difficult for me to drop off sometimes on the days I exercise, when I would expect to be out like a light! I drink 2 cups of tea early in the morning & take no other caffeine . I am in no pain & take no medication. I do not nap during the day, & it is a huge challenge not to in the evenings, but I fight not to. Moving about helps.
    Of more concern to me, is that I have tried altering the SW 15 mins either end & it does not extend my sleep beyond 5.5hrs. As I feel awful often on this amount of sleep over 7 months it cannot be that I only need 5.5hrs. even if it is sound sleep. My sleep since the sleepio course has been sound & that is an improvement on the previous months. All my life- I am now 72, I have enjoyed 8 hrs sound sleep from 11 pm to 7.30 until a year ago.
    How can I break this SW from 11pm to 5.15 & get up with the alarm instead of before it? I can keep bringing forward my bed-time by 15 mins. but not endlessly, or I will be up at 3 am. I hope to sleep in beyond 5.15 am. If I go to bed later it is such a struggle to keep awake until bed- time & I wake up later but still sleep for only 5.5 hrs. I am not able to get back to sleep once I wake. I feel I am stuck with this for ever, & it affects the quality of my life.

    Is the key to all this my habitual level of above average, low to moderate tension during the day?--but this has been my personality all my life, & has not affected my sleep before. Do I need to meditate several times a day to relax more? I have run out of ideas.

Return to top