Live discussion with Dr John Cape - 21st October 2015

Dr Cape will be hosting a live online discussion here on Wednesday 21st October 7pm-8.30pm BST.

He will discuss as many topics as possible in the hour and a half and, as always, you’re welcome to ask any questions at all about sleep or the Sleepio program. Please do note however that, as per our guidelines, Dr Cape won’t be able to give personal medical advice. His replies to questions will be made in such a way as to help as many people as possible who might have similar issues.

To keep up with new comments as they are posted you will need to 'refresh' this discussion page.

To do this:

- On PC hit 'Ctrl' and 'R' or the 'F5' key – On Mac hit 'Command' or 'Apple' and 'R'

Posted 16 Oct 2015 at 12:21 PM
  • 31 comments
  • 6 helped

Comments

Show older comments
  • Sleepio Member

    • 302 comments
    • 72 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi Valbeasixties
    Thanks for your question about alcohol. Great you are committed to following through with your to do list while doing the programme and good to be anticipating in advance about the longer term. Alcohol can complicate and contribute to sleep problems which is why the advice in session 2 about this. But when people have re-established a good sleep pattern after graduating, it is certainly fine to have a social evening drink in moderation. Being rigorous with following the Sleepio programme will establish a good sleep habit – once established it is not necessary to be so rigorous unless a person starts slipping back in which case going back to being rigorous will get them on track again.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 38 comments
    • 5 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Hello I posted a question on taking melatonin

  • Sleepio Member

    • 302 comments
    • 72 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi Milo
    Light therapy is mainly a treatment for circadian rhythm disorders which are when the natural 24 hour sleep cycle linked with night hours is disrupted. It works by shifting the body clock. It would not be expected to help with waking up in the middle of the night and not getting back to sleep: https://www.sleepio.com/library/article/what-is-bright-light-therapy/
    I see you have just started the course. Waking up in the middle of the night and not getting back to sleep is one of the most common problems and the techniques of Sleepio are designed to help this. All the best and do post further questions in future

  • Sleepio Member

    • 6 comments
    • 0 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Thanks for the response

  • Sleepio Member

    • 6 comments
    • 0 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Thanks for the response

  • Sleepio Member

    • 302 comments
    • 72 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi sleepypuss
    Good to hear you feel you are making progress with Sleepio. You certainly have an added challenge with shift work. There is an article in the Sleepio library about shift work and sleep, which has a few tips in the last paragraph: https://www.sleepio.com/library/article/shift-work-and-sleep/
    and a longer booklet:
    https://www.sleepio.com/articles/shiftwork/
    Your specific question was about using non-prescription sleep aids when moving from day to night shift. Advice about sleep medication, in line with our guidelines, we advise people to consult with their medical practitioner about, but following the Sleepio programme is helpful whether people use sleeping medication or not.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 302 comments
    • 72 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi Petalangel
    There is some evidence for melatonin in helping people get to sleep more quickly, but there are few long term studies.
    https://www.sleepio.com/library/article/what-is-melatonin/
    There is also some evidence for it being helpful for delayed sleep phase disorder. https://www.sleepio.com/library/article/what-is-delayed-sleep-phase-disorder/
    Whether it would be appropriate for you and questions of dose you would need to discuss with your doctor. I see you have just started the Sleepio course. All the best with it and do come back with further questions if you want

  • Sleepio Member

    • 38 comments
    • 5 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Thank you for the reply I will read the articles.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 302 comments
    • 72 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi Winter
    You ask whether magnesium baths and spray on oils help sleep. There is no scientific evidence for this, although I know some people feel they have helped them. Some people find a bath as part of their wind down routine before bed relaxing and may use different minerals or oils for their bath. Anything that works as part of a regular wind down routine before bed can be helpful and people are individual in what works for them as a wind down routine (everyone has a different wind down routine).

  • Sleepio Member

    • 302 comments
    • 72 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi Vickylea
    Yes, tinnitus is unpleasant and can be especially troublesome at night and disturb sleep as you describe. There is a Sleepio community discussion on tinnitus where people with tinnitus have shared their experience of managing sleep with tinnitus, which you might want to check out:
    https://www.sleepio.com/community/discussion/tinnitus/
    I see you are at session 2. Later sessions (4 and 5) cover approaches that can be helpful in managing the heightened awareness of tinnitus at night. All the best with it.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 302 comments
    • 72 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi again Winter
    Session 3 is when many people feel they are getting worse rather than better. See the session 3 community discussion posts:
    https://www.sleepio.com/community/discussion/session-3-general-discussion/
    And some people can feel like quitting:
    https://www.sleepio.com/library/article/i-feel-like-quitting/
    Moving to a new, better sleep pattern is tough and often sleep deteriorates before it improves. But the evidence is that if you stick with it, most peoples’ sleep does improve.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 30 comments
    • 3 helped
    Graduate

    I've been put on beta blockers. I've been sleeping much better since, getting nearly 7hrs a night…. However, I still cant sleep in bed. I end up on the sofa every night. I'm not sure how to crack this without setting myself back.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 142 comments
    • 29 helped
    Graduate

    Hi Dr Cape & Vickylea I to have tinnitus and it is horrible I went to E.N.T. last week they told me there wasn't anything wrong with my ears which was good news, the advice they gave me was virtually everything we are practicing on sleepio. Hope this has been of use .
    est wishes .
    Trevor.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 302 comments
    • 72 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi Zeto
    Beta-blockers are known to be associated with sleep problems, including night time awakenings. This just affects some people. I don't know if the time of day they are taken makes any difference. You would need to check this out with your cardiologist. But the difference between good sleepers and poor sleepers is not so much that good sleepers have no or fewer nighttime disturbances (from internal bodily or external environmental factors) but that when the good sleepers are disturbed they go quickly back to sleep very often not being fully aware or remembering that they were awakened. The Sleepio course teaches ways to deal with awakenings so that they interfere minimally or not at all with restful sleep. If you have further questions as you go along with the course, do post again

  • Sleepio Member

    • 302 comments
    • 72 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi Dawnie
    Having just replied to someone that beta-blockers can lead to sleep problems, you post that they are helping you sleep! Just shows how individual people are. Could you clarify what happens that you end up on the sofa? Do you start in bed, get up and the fall asleep on the sofa or do you not go to bed at all?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 302 comments
    • 72 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi Trevor
    Thanks for your helpful post. Yes the type of techniques of cognitive behaviour therapy covered in session 4 and 5 of Sleepio, are also used to help people manage tinnitus. There is quite a bit of literature and evidence that they can help – not cure of course, but help people manage their unpleasant tinnitus

  • Sleepio Member

    • 142 comments
    • 29 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Thanks for the reply Trevor.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 30 comments
    • 3 helped
    Graduate

    Hi,
    I get into bed. Don't manage to sleep, so 30mins later I go back downstairs- sleep!

  • Sleepio Member

    • 302 comments
    • 72 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi again Dawnie
    Thanks for clarifying. Yes some people get out of bed when they don't sleep (appropriately using the Quarter of an Hour Rule) go and sit somewhere and fall asleep where they are sitting. After this has happened a few times the chair or sofa where they have been sitting becomes associated with sleep. So rather than creating a bed-sleep association to replace the previous bed-awake association, which is what Sleepio is designed to do, they now have a chair/sofa-sleep association! To change this it is best they not sit/lie on this chair/sofa when they get out of bed, but use another chair and make sure they go back to bed when they are sleepy-tired rather than falling asleep in this new chair. This can feel like going backwards (as sleep will be more disrupted again), but does bring about the appropriate bed-sleep connection in due course. All the best with it

  • Sleepio Member

    • 302 comments
    • 72 helped
    Expert

    We have come to then end of our time today. Thanks for all your excellent questions.

Return to top