Live Discussion with Dr Jen Kanady - 26th February 2020

Dr Kanady will be hosting a live online discussion here on Wednesday 26th February, from 8.00pm to 9.30pm British Time or 3.00pm to 4.30pm US Eastern Time.

They will discuss as many topics as possible in the hour and, as always, you are welcome to ask any questions at all about sleep or the Sleepio program. If there are a lot of questions, they may not be able to answer all in the time available, but will try to answer as many as they can.

Please do note that, as per our guidelines, Dr Kanady will not be able to give personal medical advice including those about medication. Their replies to questions will be made in such a way as to help as many people as possible who might have similar issues.

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Posted 20 Feb 2020 at 10:50 PM
  • 8 comments
  • 1 helped

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  • Sleepio Member

    • 1 comments
    • 0 helped
    Session 4

    I have just completed Session 3, which includes Bed-Sleep Connection and Pro-sleep Schedule. In my living situation I only have one room that is completely mine, so I have to do things other than sleep in my room and the other parts of the building are shared, so trying to relax in them is not safe or possible. How do I continue the course if I can't do this part, as it seems vital?
    Living in a shared house also makes it hard to not be affected by the schedules of other people.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 453 comments
    • 181 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Hi Bearsneedsleep!
    Just checking in with you as you have to wait for a couple more days before the doctor is here.
    You might have to see sleep as a conditioned response to being in bed…..so although you only have one room to 'live' in, I would think you have to limit the time you are actually in bed itself. If you have a chair or settee, then use that to sit on until it is time for bed. Bed is just for sleeping in.
    If you think about how we bring babies up; they get put down to sleep in a cot, pram etc. When they wake, they are lifted out and only go back to lie down to sleep, in a quiet room.
    Over the years, the connection with our bed has got lost along the way and we read, play on iPads etc, so we have learnt bad habits…which in years gone by no one would have done – maybe read. You only went to bed to sleep or if you were ill.
    So, maybe keep a lamp by your chair at the other side of the room, away from the bed area. And if you need to get up, go to the chair or settee, but don’t lie down on the settee, or you’ll fall asleep on it!! Use your lamp only, in the evenings to keep the room calm. No bright lights.
    You’re in an even more difficult situation having to share the house with others…not sure what you can do to keep them quiet when you need to sleep…except ask nicely??
    Let us know on your personal page or mine, how you are getting along. Best sleepy wishes.
    Kurly

  • Sleepio Member

    • 1 comments
    • 0 helped
    Session 5

    I have a question about the quarter hour rule. Frequently, I am getting drowsy around the quarter hour mark and feel like another 10-20 min and I will be asleep. Is the rule hard and fast or can I fudge it a bit?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 376 comments
    • 120 helped
    Expert

    Hello Sleepio community! My name is Dr. Jennifer Kanady and I am a clinical and research psychologist with an expertise in sleep. I am here to answer any and all sleep-related questions for the next 1.5 hours.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 376 comments
    • 120 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi Bearneedsleep,

    This is such a great question and I am really glad you asked. In an ideal world, both the bed and bedroom would be for sleep only. This is to break the association between the bed/bedroom and wakefulness and reassociate the bed/bedroom with sleep. However, this is not always feasible due to things like living arrangements (e.g., roommates), mobility issues (e.g., pain), and other circumstances. This is where the bed-sleep connection requires some creativity! For individuals whose bedroom is also their living space (e.g., living in a studio apartment, having roommates), I typically recommend keeping the bed for sleep only and limiting other activities to outside the bed. Some ways for achieving this might include bringing a chair into the bedroom and doing activities other than sleep while sitting on the chair. Or maybe putting some pillows on the floor and using this space for activities. For individuals who don’t have the space for additional furniture, another idea might be designating one side of the bed for sleep and the other side of the bed for wake. The general recommendation is that individuals play around to find a compromise that works for them.

    Please feel free to reach out with additional questions.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 376 comments
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    In reply to a deleted comment
    Expert

    Hi GrammaKar,

    You have demonstrated some really great insight here. You are absolutely correct; sleep and anxiety exhibit a bidirectional relationship. That is, the more anxious we feel, the poorer we sleep, and the poorer we sleep, the more anxious we feel. However, and importantly, the inverse is also true! Reductions in anxiety usually result in reductions in sleep disturbance and reductions in sleep disturbance usually result in reductions in anxiety. That’s the good news!

    I see that you are on Session 2. During Session 4 and Session 5, the Prof will introduce several techniques that can be helpful for reducing the worries and thoughts that interfere with sleep. One technique that can sometimes be helpful for people who experience worrying is “scheduled worry time.” The idea behind this technique is that 30 minutes of the day are set aside for worrying. Let’s say that 12-12:30 PM is the “scheduled worry time.” During those 30 minutes, the person writes down as many worries as possible. Then, once those 30 minutes are up, worry time is over. If worries start creeping in at other points in the day, the person can say, “nope, I already worried about that earlier” or, “nope, I have time set aside to worry about that tomorrow.”

    For more information about cognitive therapy, you can click on either of the two Sleepio library article links below.

    Cognitive techniques, in depth: https://www.sleepio.com/library/article/cognitive-techniques-in-depth/

    Challenging your thoughts: https://www.sleepio.com/library/article/challenging-your-thoughts/

  • Sleepio Member

    • 376 comments
    • 120 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Expert

    Hi RhondaG,

    Thanks for the question. The idea behind the quarter of an hour rule is to break the association between the bed and wakefulness. Prolonged periods of wakefulness in bed teach the brain that the bed is a place for wake (and often associated frustration!). This is why the general recommendation is to get out of bed after 15 minutes of wake -- reteaching the brain that the bed is a place for sleep.

    While 15-20 minutes is the general rule of thumb, the reality is that Sleepio is a self-help program and it is up to the user to figure out how to modify the interventions in a way that makes sense for them.

    Something else that may be helpful to consider is what kind of activities you should do outside of bed. The general recommendation is to find activities that are going to be relaxing and sleep promoting (e.g., relaxation/breathing exercises, listening to mellow music). And above all else, these activities should be done in darkness/dim light conditions.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 376 comments
    • 120 helped
    Expert

    Signing off now. Thanks for the great questions and looking forward to our next chat. Happy sleeping!

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