Does Restless Leg Syndrome keep you up during the night?

Jumping, itchy & uncomfortable legs can be a real problem – I'd love to hear from anyone who's experienced this

Posted 10 Jan 2012 at 5:52 PM
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  • Sleepio Member

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    Graduate

    Thanks for that davyboy. I believe magnesium also helps with leg cramps.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Graduate

    Personal experience: Magnesium in could help with improving sleep in general, not just restless legs..
    I take 400mg of Magnesium Citrate every evening,
    Make sure you get magnesium citrate, not magnesium oxide, the latter is literally useless

  • Sleepio Member

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    Restless legs run in my family. I have had it since I was a teenager. When Requip (Ropinirole) came out it was like a miracle for me.I take 2 -2mg tablets about an hour before sleep. One big side effect of this drug is it can lead to excessive gambling. I was worried. But after taking it for 5 years everything is fine. I have noticed that I am feeling that sensation in my legs again sometimes earlier in the evening so I have had to experiment with taking it sooner.Good luck, restless legs is horrible. I had people that didn't believe me when I tried to explain it. The concept was so foreign to them and its not something you can actually see to verify the condition.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Graduate

    I have RLS with Periodic Limb Movement that I control by slow (less than 1 mph) walks in the middle of the night. Some nights though it looks to my Jawbone device that I am awake and it is just the PLM in action

  • Sleepio Member

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    Welcome Igraine. Hopefully reading the above posts has helped you. Also, if you haven't already, you can search restless leg syndrome. There is an article that may help. You can always post a question on the ask the expert forums too. I am sure that you will get some help by this and other community members who suffer from this. Take care!

  • Sleepio Member

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    Graduate

    As I am sat here now typing, or generally relaxing in the evening I tend to experience agitation in my legs. Fortunately it seems to lessen by bedtime. Just wanting to shake them or move around. It can last for an hour or so and can be very irritating especially if at the cinema, or with friends on an evening. Alcohol can provoke it at times. The trigger seems to have been taking mirtazapine for 8-9 months for depression some 4 years ago. I guess this is linked to dopamine receptors. Mild exercise really helps and muscle relaxation. I discussed it with an NHS Homeopathic Doctor who prescribed me Causticum as needed and this does really help. Has anyone else found other useful remedies or tips to lessen these annoying symptoms. Thanks

  • Sleepio Member

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    Hi Mike,
    It does sound as though you may have RLS which has a typical onset when at rest usually at night. You may benefit from medical advice from your GP. The first thing they are likely to do is blood tests to exclude anything that may be easily treatable like iron deficiency. It's also worth having a look at RLS or Ekbom disease association websites. They have a number of self help and life style suggestions that may be useful.

    My symptoms are quite different to yours I get all types of weird sensations like burning skin, tingling etc. I've tried just about all of the self help measures to no avail. However, all people are different so you may well find that they bring you some relief – It's certainly worth a try. The thing non drug thing that I have found most useful is the application of cold against my legs. I have 2 large (±12“x18”) gel pads which I wrap around my legs when I'm woken by these sensations. I also sometimes put my feet or legs up against the cold outside wall alongside my bed.

    In desperation I've also gone down the drug route (including dopamine agonists (Ropinerole) and anti convulsants (Gabapentin) which were prescribed by a neurologist). Although I found that the Gabapentin helped me to sleep better it made me feel worse than I felt with disrupted sleep – i.e. very muzzy headed. I've now settled on “just” taking prescription sleeping pills every night. I'm not happy about this and hope to gradually come off them with the help of the Sleepio course. Surprisingly, the neurologist has informed me that when sleeping pills are used for neurological disorders they do not have the same addictive effects as they do when used for insomnia??!!.... my GP is sceptical about this opinion.

    Hope you find something that helps you!

    All the best!

  • Sleepio Member

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    I suffer from RLS and have noticed that now I am doing SR my symptoms have got a lot worse – especially late at night when I am trying to stay awake until 12.00. I have to keep moving my legs all the time and this is very tiring especially when I am already exhausted through lack of sleep. Has anyone else noticed this?

  • Sleepio Member

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    Session 4

    I have had RLS for about 15 years, and I found that a very simple solution works for me (it may not work for everyone). I make sure to take a multivitamin every night before I go to sleep. Without it, my RLS is incredibly annoying and prevents me from sleeping. But with it, I am completely fine. I even need to remember the vitamin for long plane rides, when my RLS really acts up. I am forever grateful to a friend that mentioned that Zinc/Mn supplements have been known to help RLS. It certainly has been a life changer for me. Good luck everyone!

  • Sleepio Member

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    Hi Taykoh. Which multivitamin do you take. I have just bought some but just wondered which ones are best for RLS?

  • Sleepio Member

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    I have RLS occasionally – my legs don't jump, but it feels like they're about to, and it's impossible to get to sleep. I've found that if I haven't drunk a lot of water during the day, RLS is more likely to happen. It sounds simplistic, but it's the one commonality that I can pinpoint. But I'm going to try magnesium or multivitamins, too.

  • Sleepio Member

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    The new thinking on RLS is that it's caused by 'inflammation' in the body. Inflammation is purported to be caused by eating grains and sugar essentially. By eating a fresh diet with no processed food or sugars you can control the amount of inflammation in the body. I have tried this and it has worked for me and when I have weakened and had a chocolate attack I mostly know I'm going to suffer that night. There is a very good lighthearted website I found called something like How I Cured My RLS and P'd Off Big Pharma. Something like that anyway. It's very interesting and very informative. Hope it helps somebody. By the way I'm taking Magnesium Threonate as well.

  • Sleepio Member

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    I have suffered from RLS for some time, keeping me awake for hours on end. I now eat a banana a day, and since doing so haven't had any RLS! It works for me. Worth a try.

  • Sleepio Member

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    I am currently doing the sleepio programme. My question relates to my partner's restless leg syndrome which actually disturbs me as i am trying to fall asleep. Anyone else experiences this? What do you recommend to address the problem?

  • Sleepio Member

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    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Session 2

    yes separate beds (pushed together), separate quilts

  • Sleepio Member

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    Hi everyone I'm new just started today. I find that anything with antihistamine makes restless legs much worse. As antihistamine is in nearly every over the counter tablet to help with aiding sleep I wonder if other people have made the connection. Just to make everyone aware.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Session 2

    I have suffered with restless leg syndrome since I was 12. I didn't even know what it was until I heard someone mention it one time and then I looked it up, and it is exactly what I have. It is the most annoying thing in the world and is the #1 cause of my sleep problems. The thing that works for me the best is pressure. I have bought compression socks that I wear up to my knees that help, but not 100%. I sometimes have my boyfriend lay on my legs, but it's not something he will do all night. I need something that will give me pressure on my legs while in bed. Anyone have any suggestions?

  • Sleepio Member

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    I too suffer the same as you. Reading your comment was like I had written it myself. I now take my ropinerol at about 6. 00 pm as my legs started to get going earlier.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Graduate

    I recommend that anyone with restless leg syndrome take a look at the RLS Foundation website: http://www.rls.org/ They have a wealth of information, and support exploratory research about RLS.

    If you're taking a dopamine-related drug, and you're getting symptoms earlier in the evening, you may be having “augmentation”. Look it up on the RLS Foundation site, and resist if your doctor wants to increase your dose -- that becomes a vicious cycle.

    Personally, I have Periodic Limb Movement Disorder, which is like RLS but happens only while asleep. They are related disorders, and many people with RLS also have PLMs, but not necessarily vice versa.

    I also sometimes have garden-variety insomnia, which is what brought me to Sleepio. Given that PLMD disrupts my sleep quality, I don't want to lose any sleep to insomnia.

  • Sleepio Member

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    Now that RLS has been accepted as a 'real' problem for people and doctors understand the disruption of sleep caused from it there has been more research done. I've suffered with RLS long before anyone knew what it was and other family members suffer from it as well. Ropineral did not work for me, it made my RLS worse so was switched to Mirapex which works great.

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