Ask the Grads

Whether you're in need of some friendly advice and encouragement from people who have been through the course or you'd simply like another perspective on implementing a new technique, you can pose your questions about the Sleepio course directly to the Graduates here!

Posted 29 Apr 2012 at 8:06 PM
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  • Sleepio Member

    • 192 comments
    • 64 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Sounds good JohnB, that is the way sleepio works, a few good nights and then some bad ones, then gradually the bad nights become less and then the odd blip now and then, but confidence builds up and sleepless nights become a thing of the past, but don't become complacent JohnB, keep up with what Prof has taught you….....and watch that coffee.

    Keep sharing your experience with the community because it helps the new sleepios.

    Best wishes

    Ve

  • Sleepio Member

    • 5 comments
    • 0 helped
    Graduate

    I've been thinking more and more about this type of research and data collecting and while on many levels I am filled with gratitude for such successful programs like Sleepio, on the other hand I wonder who would be interested in this kind of data and how the data may be bought/sold to other entities either pro/con to my benefit. For the same reasons I am weary of using devices such as Fitbit or the Garmen tracker bands as well.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 3 comments
    • 0 helped
    Session 4

    Hi all, I'm a little confused on how to log “time awake” in the middle of the night that I am up out of bed with a baby. This is obviously not due to my own trouble sleeping. It's not every night, but with a 4 month old, about half of the time I am actually up attending to the baby and not laying in bed trying to fall asleep. The sleep log just asks for time time you initially go to bed and the time you get up, doesn't leave any space for non-insomnia related out of bed time.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 1 comments
    • 0 helped
    Graduate

    I'm on week 5 of the Sleepio course. After the calibration part, Sleepio decided that my target range to start should be 6 hours. I followed the regimen exactly, and got to bed at 11:30 every night (plus or minus 5 minutes or so). After 2 weeks, I hit the 90% sleep efficiency target, and shifted my bedtime to 11:15. I was really looking forward to that extra 15 minutes of sleep! The problem is that I have started waking up 15 minutes earlier on average, despite me leaving my alarm set at the old time, so I'm still only getting 6 hours of sleep.

    My target is 7 hours of sleep, eventually. I'm pretty sure that's my optimal sleep range, since I took the most wonderful vacation of my life in May, when my husband and I went to Barcelona to celebrate our 20th anniversary. I shut off my work email, we rented this lovely apartment in a quiet neighborhood, and according to my Fitbit tracker, I averaged about 7 and a quarter hours sleep per night.

    Has anyone else had this problem? Any suggestions?

    Laura

  • Sleepio Member

    • 2 comments
    • 1 helped
    Session 4

    Hi everyone

    I'm new here also nerves, I have trouble sleeping cos I dream every night,
    Sometimes there nightmares this is why I'm here, Its impacting on my sleep, tho sleeping trouble runs in the family,
    I'm wondering how of you dream and if so do you dream every night,
    Thank you for your time
    Karen

  • Sleepio Member

    • 1 comments
    • 0 helped
    Graduate

    I have started using the sleep tracker called Beddit:
    http://www.beddit.com
    And as I see it, it's much more reliable and accurate than the two Jawbone trackers I have used in the past years: the Up24 and UP3.

    Have any of you tried it. And what is you're experiences?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 192 comments
    • 64 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Hi Karen, Welcome to sleepio, I am one of the grads and really glad that I joined because I have really good sleep now. I have times when I dream every night and it wakes me, but I generally fall back to sleep again. but it's a long times since I had nightmares. I know certain medications can cause really bad nightmares. I have little dreams that don't bother me occasionally and I can't even remember what they were when I wake up. I also used to sleepwalk sometimes when I was little and talk to mum or dad in my sleep, but I would be taken back to bed and I wouldn't remember it in the morning. I grew out of that though.

    Let's hope that as you go through this programme that your dreams or nightmares will become less as you learn to have a much deeper and more relaxing sleep.

    Keep in touch with the community Karen, you will find them very helpful as you go through this course, and you may pick up a few helpful tips too.

    Best wishes

    Ve

  • Sleepio Member

    • 192 comments
    • 64 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Hi Ibagnall, I had that problem too but I have discovered that I don't need the amount of sleep that I thought I needed. I think we get it into our heads that we need 7 or 8 hours sleep a night but I no longer believe that to be true. Since getting over my insomnia I have between 5 and 6 hours of sleep and because it is deep with often no wake ups I do not feel tired during the day. I am last in bed and first up in the morning, and it is all good, I enjoy a relaxing cup of coffee and watch the news (which is always not good), but my sleep is and I do not hanker after getting any more and I gratefully accept the time I get asleep.

    Congratulations on your 20th wedding anniversary. I went to Barcelona with a few mates and enjoyed it very much. We found great tapas bars and there was loads to do and see.

    Hope you do well with sleepio, let us know how you are getting on and good luck on reaching 7 hours kip.

    Ve

  • Sleepio Member

    • 435 comments
    • 248 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Hi ericalee,
    That's a tough call! You have my sympathies. I hope your baby learns to sleep for longer soon to give you a better chance of working on your own sleep.
    Probably the best benefit you'll get from the programme while you're still being woken by baby is to get back to sleep more quickly. The Progressive Relaxation download should be available for you by now, so have a go using that once your baby has settled down. Can you get some nights off by sharing duties with a partner? I used to express milk sometimes so my husband could do one of the night feeds – my baby was a real guzzler.
    Although it isn't really an accurate reflection of your own sleep pattern, I think you need to record the times you are awake seeing to your baby as a waking time in the diary. Although it may give you a lower sleep efficiency, and keep your sleep window restricted, that will at least mean the sleep pressure will build up more and help with getting back to sleep. (Got to look for the positives!)
    I'm sure the next few weeks will be difficult, with the combination of the sleepio programme, baby wakings and mommy brain! Do use the community whenever you need some comfort or the company of fellow travellers.
    All the best, Marie

  • Sleepio Member

    • 3 comments
    • 0 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Session 4

    Thanks Marie :) The baby is getting there, we are in the trenches of sleep training at the moment with him! My husband definitely took some shifts with pumped milk in the early days, but the baby is not really hungry in the middle of the night anymore so we are just working on getting him used to sleeping a longer stretch. Honestly, it's not too often that he is waking me anymore. I am waking really early (around 4am), so usually am already up when he starts his shenannigans. I have never had trouble sleeping until after the interrupted sleep and added stress of the newborn stage. I was on sleeping pills for 10 weeks before cutting them out- struggling falling asleep, staying asleep AND waking early. Luckily now I'm only having trouble waking early so that kinda coincides with the sleep restriction week anyways!

  • Sleepio Member

    • 4 comments
    • 0 helped
    Session 4

    I noticed that when I was waking up it seemed that I was gasping for air I've caught myself doing this while waking a couple of times its kinda scary an makes me scared.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 1 comments
    • 0 helped
    Graduate

    Has anyone experience awakening out of a their sleep due to aches ? I am not a person who takes medication however as the older I get I found myself taking over the counter anti inflammatory to reduce severe pain in my shoulder blade and left breast. In the past I hated taking prescription and Otc pain reducers because I managed to still awakening out of my sleep feeling drugged,irritated and tried throughout the day. Is there any other options to staying asleep?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 2 comments
    • 1 helped
    Session 3

    Obviously I have some serious sleep issues. Going on year 7. Frustrating doesn't even begin to describe what it's like. Last night I opted for relaxing my body, cooler room, tv off, and no sleeping meds. I was awake until 6:30 am. Slept for 1.5 hours, then tried to fall back asleep for another hour and a half. My question is… Even though I am not asleep, is my body getting any benefit from just laying there trying to fall back asleep? Or should I just give up and get up. Hoping this program works. More than hoping.

  • Sleepio Member

    • 192 comments
    • 64 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    I had that experience of gasping for air Lana, but it was at a time when I was having panic attacks and really bad anxiety. It is scary. However now that I sleep well and don't have panic attacks or anxiety I no longer gasp for air when waking up. Now that you have started doing something about your sleep it may disappear for you too, but you could also have a chat with your GP to make sure it is related to anxiety.

    Best wishes

    Ve

  • Sleepio Member

    • 192 comments
    • 64 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    There are several options that you need to check out Deepdimples. First of all you should get checked out by your GP. Then make sure you have a good mattress and pillow. Keeping your spine in good alignment when you sleep is important, and a bad pillow that doesn't support you neck will cause aches and pains.

    So you need to get that pain investigated first.

    Ve

  • Sleepio Member

    • 1 comments
    • 0 helped
    Session 5

    I've struggled with insomnia for about 10 years, getting to sleep easily but waking in the night for a few hours at a time with a racing mind and then falling asleep on the settee during the early evening. I've been following the sleep programme for a few weeks now and I'm coping ok with forcing myself to stay awake until 11pm and getting up at 6am, however I'm really struggling with getting up inthe night if I've been awake for 15 mins, I've only managed it once and was exhausted the following day, in the middle of the night the desire to go back to sleep is outweighing the idea of a long term 'fix'. Has anyone got any tips that will help me get out of bed when bed isn't the right place to be?!
    Also, I am finding it difficult to focus on imagary and relaxation techniques as my mind returns to whatever it is I was thinking about and in'forget' to concentrate on relaxing! Don't know if that makes any sense?

    Thanks in advance
    Jo

  • Sleepio Member

    • 192 comments
    • 64 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Hi SleepUser, I found the QHR difficult so I got up if I wasn't asleep within about 25 minutes, I just knew I wasn't going to drop off. But that getting up in the night is very important, because you have to associate your bed with sleep, not laying awake and hoping that you might drop off sometime. Think of getting up as therapy. The more you are out of your bed if you cannot sleep, the more chance you have of sleeping within the hours that Prof gave you. But you have to work at it, don't do it half hearted, give it your all. When you get up keep the lights down low, make yourself a warm drink and/or listen to PR.

    Also for that racing mind SleepUser, try concentrating on your breathing, lay on your back, hands on tummy and feel your breath going in and out. If your mind starts to wander again, bring it back to the breathing.
    If you start to feel that sleep may come, turn onto your favourite position and try sleeping. Keep everything regular, do the same things over and over again and then your mind will start to realise that it is sleep time.

    It's a hard course, but medication doesn't teach you anything, but the sleepio programme teaches you how to sleep again, it works, it takes time and commitment, and perseverance. When you start to sleep the programme becomes a little easier. The course does seem counterproductive, having to get up when you want to sleep, but what it does is forces the sleep to come at your sleep time, by getting up if you can't sleep you are teaching your mind that you will not put up with insomnia and that you want to sleep within your allotted hours. You are in charge and you will overcome it. Be strong, be strict and you will get there.

    Ve

  • Sleepio Member

    • 42 comments
    • 7 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Hi Shopgirl,

    You're only on week 2, which is when The Prof is monitoring your sleep prior to giving your personal sleep window and introducing you to the Quarter Hour Rule and other things. But to answer your question: no, you are not getting any benefit by lying in bed trying to get to sleep. In fact that's only making things worse!

    Next week you will begin the course proper, and over the next few weeks you will see how it all works. But just do what you do naturally for now, and then wait until the The Prof sorts you out. It may be difficult, but it will be worth it one way or another! And we're also here for you too. :-)

  • Sleepio Member

    • 2 comments
    • 0 helped
    Session 4

    Hello. I just finished Week 3's video session. I have a question about doing nothing but sleep in the bedroom. The only place in my house with any comfort, including heating & cooling, is my bedroom. Did any graduates have this sort of living situation? What did you do? Or, alternatively, will it hurt that much if I do other things in my bedroom, as long as I keep my bed only for sleep?

  • Sleepio Member

    • 435 comments
    • 248 helped
    in reply to Sleepio Member
    Graduate

    Hi Flemball,
    It's not the bedroom you have to avoid, it's the bed.
    There have been other people in that situation, and one suggestion was to have a chair in the bedroom that you can use for reading, winding down etc. The main thing is not to get into bed to do that. If there's no room for a chair, you could just sit on the foot of the bed – I know that's not very comfortable, but you do need to avoid lying down in bed or in your usual sleeping position…that will just get your rewiring crossed! So yes, you can do other things in your bedroom as long as you keep the bed for sleeping.
    Marie

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