Spring Clock Change 2013

29th March 2013 by Rosie Gollancz

Great British Sleep Survey Sleep news

Spring clock change 2013

Photo credit: RHiNO NEAL

With the end of March rapidly approaching, the UK is preparing itself for the spring clock change and the start of ‘British Summer Time’.

Unfortunately, it looks like it will still be some time until you can dust off your swimming costume, instead the 31st will mark the loss of an hour’s precious sleep.

To add to this, the newest results from the Great British Sleep Survey suggest that you may also have a full week of poor quality sleep to contend with. In fact, the survey of more than 21000 UK adults has recorded an average 8% fall in sleep quality during the week of the spring clock change in previous years [1].

This yearly dip is accompanied by 12% more people suffering low energy, 12% more people with low productivity and 11% more people with disrupted relationships [2-4].

Thankfully this should only mark a temporary blip in the nation’s sleep, with scores to returning to normal levels in the fortnight following the transition to British Summer Time (BST).

Sleepio Expert, Prof Colin Espie says:

“Sudden shifts in clock time force our internal biological clock to re-synchronise, which doesn’t happen straight away, and can take several days. This can affect the quality of our sleep and, as the survey results show, leave us feeling more tired throughout the day.

The good news however, is that once our bodies have had time to acclimatise to the new sleep schedule, the survey data suggest that sleep quality should settle at normal levels once again.”

Thankfully we have the Bank Holiday to recover, so take pleasure in your lie-in on Monday and we hope you enjoy your Easter break!

[1] The average Sleep Score of those completing the survey in the fortnight before the spring clock change in 2010, 2011 and 2012 was 5.17/10, compared to an average of 5.09/10 for those completing it during the week of the clock change, a fall of 7.9%.
[2] Of those who completed the survey in the fortnight before the clock change, 62.4% complained of low energy, compared to 74.8% during the week of the clock change, an increase of 12.4%.
[3] Of those who completed the survey in the fortnight before the clock change, 54.9% complained of lower productivity, compared to 66.5% during the week of the clock change, an increase of 11.5%.
[4] Of those who completed the survey in the fortnight before the clock change, 72.8% complained of disruption to their personal relationships, compared to 83.9% during the week of the clock change, an increase of 11%.

Add a comment

All fields are required. Email will not be published.